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Greg Saven

ratings
67
REVIEWS
4
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
0
HELPFUL VOTES
6

  • Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Michael Moss
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1056)
    Performance
    (927)
    Story
    (921)

    Every year, the average American eats 33 pounds of cheese (triple what we ate in 1970) and 70 pounds of sugar (about 22 teaspoons a day). We ingest 8,500 milligrams of salt a day, double the recommended amount, and almost none of that comes from the shakers on our table. It comes from processed food. It’s no wonder, then, that one in three adults, and one in five kids, is clinically obese.

    Michael says: "This is all too real, and YOU are the victim."
    "Another good reminder of our poison food supply."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    There is nothing "shocking" about the information presented in this book. If the fact that "food" corporations... I mean the "substances that we shovel into our gluttonous pie holes" corporations are not acting in our best interest is surprising to you, then you are naive.

    However, it is an interesting listen. One should listen to as many books of this nature as one can, and as often as one can, so as to be reminded to stay on the right path. The "substances that we shovel into our gluttonous pie holes" corporations are frighteningly powerful and are unfortunately winning the war against good health.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Moby-Dick

    • UNABRIDGED (22 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Herman Melville
    • Narrated By James Conlan
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (63)
    Performance
    (55)
    Story
    (52)

    Herman Melville’s classic masterpiece tells the story of the wandering sailor Ishmael and his voyage on the whaleship Pequod, commanded by Captain Ahab. Ishmael soon learns that Ahab seeks one specific whale, Moby Dick, a white sperm whale of tremendous size and ferocity. In a previous encounter, the whale destroyed Ahab's boat and bit off his leg, and Ahab intends to take revenge. The first line—"Call me Ishmael"—is one of the most famous opening lines in American literature.

    Greg Saven says: "An intolerable reading of a great novel."
    "An intolerable reading of a great novel."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I was fortunate in that I did not have Moby-Dick shoved down my throat in a high school literature class. That tends to sour kids on any novel, no matter how truly good it is. I picked it up of my own volition later in life and really enjoyed it. Melville used such a pleasing, poetic style of writing in this tale.

    It's been quite a few years since then, and this version was on sale, so I thought I'd give it a listen. I couldn't go the distance. I gave it about three hours and had to stop. The narrator was intolerable. He sounded like he was doing a voice over for a commercial or narrating one of those cheesy Discovery/TLC TV shows like "How Stuff is Made". I found him really irritating and he did not give the story the solemn dignity I pictured in my mind when I read the dead tree version. I'm going to ask for my money back.

    There are quite a few versions of this novel available on Audible, so I would suggest listening to the samples before choosing one (I wish I had). Moby-Dick is a great story and I highly recommend it, just not this version.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • The Great Gatsby

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By F. Scott Fitzgerald
    • Narrated By Tim Robbins
    Overall
    (1506)
    Performance
    (907)
    Story
    (916)

    The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald's portrait of the Jazz Age in all its decadence and excess, is, as editor Maxwell Perkins praised it in 1924, "a wonder". It remains one of the most widely read, translated, admired, imitated, and studied 20th-century works of American fiction.

    Redhawk Readers says: "Something you won't fall asleep to..."
    "Why is this considered a classic?"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Every once in a while I try to "culture" myself by listening to one of the "classics" and, more often than not, I am disappointed. Why is this considered one of the greatest works of the twentieth century? It boggles the mind.

    The story is filled with a bunch of vapid characters that elicit no empathy and engage in pointless endeavors. And then the story ends. What is the point? Maybe it was interesting in 1929, but damn, it's a bore fest now.

    Also, the recording of Robbins' narration needed to be normalized. I was constantly adjusting the volume as the level of his voice went up and down. I thought his performance was adequate, but the recording was not.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Merle's Door: Lessons from a Freethinking Dog

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 16 mins)
    • By Ted Kerasote
    • Narrated By Patrick Lawlor
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (537)
    Performance
    (198)
    Story
    (198)

    Ted Kerasote met and adopted Merle, a Labrador mix, while he was on a camping trip. Merle had been living in the wild, and after taking the dog home with him to Wyoming, Kerasote soon realized that Merle could not adjust to inhabiting exclusively the human world. So he put a door in his house to let Merle live both outside and in. A deeply touching portrait of a remarkable animal, Merle's Door explores the issues that all animals and their human companions face.

    John says: "The Best Audio Book I've ever listened to"
    "Uninteresting story read by an annoying narrator"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I found Patrick Lawlor's narration of this book annoying. He frequently attempts to mimic a dog panting and it sounds more like a cat coughing up a fur ball. I wonder if the author actually wrote those pants (I'm not sure how you'd spell them) or if the narrator was embellishing. Regardless, it was annoying. He also takes on an accent when delivering the dialog of people from other countries (e.g., Germany, Australia). This is also annoying, he does it badly, and it is completely unnecessary.

    As for the story, I found it lacking. He tells the story of the years he spent with his dog, interspersed with factoids about dogs. It's nice that he found a great dog, and that the dog enjoyed a nice life with him, but that's not enough. Something was missing. There was nothing particularly profound or even that interesting about the story. I have had dogs for years, I've done fun stuff with them, and some have died, but I don't feel the need to write about it. If you are a truly dedicated and loving dog owner, there is no reason for you to read this story. You are living it.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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