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Randy

Alameda, CA, USA

10
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 2 reviews
  • 2 ratings
  • 11 titles in library
  • 0 purchased in 2014
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  • The Wisdom of Crowds: Why the Many Are Smarter Than the Few

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By James Surowiecki
    • Narrated By Grover Gardner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (826)
    Performance
    (156)
    Story
    (166)

    In this endlessly fascinating book, New Yorker columnist James Surowiecki explores a deceptively simple idea that has profound implications: large groups of people are smarter than an elite few, no matter how brilliant. Groups are better at solving problems, fostering innovation, coming to wise decisions, even predicting the future.

    G Barth says: "Very worthwhile listen!"
    "highly recommended"
    Overall

    Not only is this stuff interesting, it really works. I tested this with some of my friends in guessing various things, like the number of steps from point a to point b. Just amazing... A great lesson about the value of the crowd's wisdom vs. the traditional view of glorifying experts.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • American Gospel: God, the Founding Fathers, and the Making of a Nation

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 5 mins)
    • By Jon Meacham
    • Narrated By Grover Gardner
    Overall
    (185)
    Performance
    (35)
    Story
    (35)

    In American Gospel (literally meaning the "good news about America"), New York Times best-selling author Jon Meacham sets the record straight on the history of religion in American public life. As Meacham shows, faith, meaning a belief in a higher power, and the sense that we are God's chosen, has always been at the heart of our national experience, from Jamestown to the Constitutional Convention to the Civil Rights Movement to September 11th.

    David I. Williams says: "Though Provoking"
    "seems very biased"
    Overall

    The author seems to write with an end in mind, rather than letting the stories tell how it really was. I am neither liberal nor conservative, but this book seems to come off very strong in the message of dividing church and state, and also ensuring tolerance. In order to make his point, he portrays a history where almost no one agreed with each other in their view of God nor religion. Therefore, everyone should keep religion private and tolerate everyone. I personally do believe that religion should not be mandated in schools, but I think there should be a healthy (and yes, optional) acknowledgement that reverence to God is part of our history.

    The author seems to go almost too much overboard in portraying a one-sided view of how history was almost disastrous because of various historical figures and their public belief in God. I am no history buff, but I can tell a slanted story when I hear one...

    Otherwise, the book was decent and interesting. However, the stories don't "flow" so well.

    9 of 22 people found this review helpful

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