Call anytime(888) 283-5051
 

You no longer follow Cynbee

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Cynbee

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Cynbee

former nuclear scientist

San Jose, CA, United States | Member Since 2012

ratings
94
REVIEWS
63
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
9
HELPFUL VOTES
80

  • Beautiful Creatures: Beautiful Creatures, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By Kami Garcia, Margaret Stohl
    • Narrated By Kevin T. Collins
    Overall
    (3225)
    Performance
    (2713)
    Story
    (2727)

    Lena Duchannes is unlike anyone the small Southern town of Gatlin has ever seen, and she's struggling to conceal her power and a curse that has haunted her family for generations. Ethan Wate, who has been counting the months until he can escape from Gatlin, is haunted by dreams of a beautiful girl he has never met. When Lena moves into the town's oldest and most infamous plantation, Ethan is inexplicably drawn to her and determined to uncover the connection between them.

    FanB14 says: "Adequate for Adults"
    "warmed over young adult supernatural fiction"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I wish Audible would categorize its books better. I should have known this is a young adult book by the description, but somehow I keep falling for the Fantasy label.

    I like a lot of young adult supernatural fiction. There is some good stuff coming out nowadays. But this book is stuffed with the tired conceits of young adult fiction, and it isn't even really self-consistent. Basically, the authors are lazy. Paranoid conviction that all the adults know something they won't tell you? Check. Intense yet unexplained love connection between two good looking yet chaste teenagers whom no one else understands? Check. One dimensional mean girls at the high school? Check. Teachers who are really just dumb placeholders? Check. Parents who are dead or otherwise out of the picture? Check.

    Come on. At no high school will freshman girls and boys be elected to be king and queen at the major dance. No one can be comfortable at a party outside where everyone is wearing super skimpy clothes (tee shirts, short dresses, etc) yet there is snow or a hurricane or a rainstorm or I forget there was always some crazy weather. And despite spending months and months trying to solve the MacGuffin - excuse me, the Incredibly Important Yet Seemingly Insurmountable And Probably Deadly Problem That Has A Known Deadline - the protagonists make unexplainably rash decisions hours before said deadline and the only explanation is "well, she is a teenager."

    This book was set up as a question of fate: are we fated to become something laid out by our forebears, or do we have free will? It could have been interesting if well-handled, but I get the feeling that the writers knew they wanted a sequel and that if they distract the young adult readers with enough magic and doofy adults then maybe no one would complain that the story just isn't that smart.

    41 of 43 people found this review helpful
  • Feed: The Newsflesh Trilogy, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 10 mins)
    • By Mira Grant
    • Narrated By Paula Christensen, Jesse Bernstein
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (903)
    Performance
    (703)
    Story
    (693)

    The year was 2014. We had cured cancer. We had beat the common cold. But in doing so we created something new, something terrible that no one could stop. The infection spread, virus blocks taking over bodies and minds with one, unstoppable command: FEED.

    susan says: "I laughed, I cried..."
    "a near-future immersive America"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I'm not big on the zombie genre, but I do like sci fi/fantasy, so I gave this book a chance. There are weaknesses - virus levels are measured in microns (a unit of length, not of number or concentration), internal inconsistencies, the villain at the end acts out a cliche that makes no sense in context (despite the speech he gives to indicate murderous insanity) - but despite all these flaws, I just wanted to keep listening. The author paints vivid pictures in an America just a few decades from now where (suspend disbelief) technology has progressed stunningly in response to a virus that creates "night of the living dead"-like zombies through a (suspend disbelief) lab-engineered mutation of the common cold. The fact that zombie-ism is contagious, and that transformation isn't immediate, is central to the plot, but the contradictions between the virus origin story and the way it behaves made me think that an origin story actually subtracts from the plot. So just power through the parts where the book's version of virology is discussed, and power through ridiculous scenes like the narrator taking the time to explain her brother's dating history during a zombie mob attack, and immerse yourself in an interesting thriller where the journalists are targeted because they tell the truth, and the harshness of a zombie-filled world forces people to horrible, soul-dimming acts of mercy and love and self-protection. "Sophie's Choice" with a virus instead of Nazis.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Ruby Red: Ruby Red Trilogy, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Kerstin Gier, Anthea Bell (translator)
    • Narrated By Marisa Calin
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (387)
    Performance
    (349)
    Story
    (346)

    Gwyneth Shepherd's sophisticated, beautiful cousin Charlotte has been prepared her entire life for traveling through time. But unexpectedly, it is Gwyneth who, in the middle of class, takes a sudden spin to a different era! Gwyneth must now unearth the mystery of why her mother would lie about her birth date to ward off suspicion about her ability, brush up on her history, and work with Gideon, the time traveler from a similarly gifted family that passes the gene through its male line, and whose presence becomes, in time, less insufferable and more essential.

    betsy says: "Where's the rest?"
    "premise undone by convenient, implausible plot"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I know that a lot of young adult (especially supernatural young adult - is there any other kind these days?) has questionable logic and behavior, presumably because teens don't think all that much of the motivations and reasoning of grown ups, but this book is extra absurd. Not only the behavior of the protagonist's mother, who irresponsibly endangers the girl, and the lack of sympathy for the poor cousin, who (as it is mentioned before she is mocked) is a real victim of the situation, but the inexplicable actions at the end of the Really Hot Guy. It's like the author didn't want to end the book without checking all the boxes. Disappointing, because this could have been an interesting blend of historical fiction and sci fi/fantasy.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Emma's Secret

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Steena Holmes
    • Narrated By Kate Rudd
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (153)
    Performance
    (141)
    Story
    (142)

    For two years, Megan, Peter, and their two older daughters, Alexis and Hannah, dream of nothing but being reunited with the family’s youngest child, Emma, who was kidnapped just before her third birthday. When Emma is miraculously found living with an elderly couple just miles from the family’s home, they are hopeful that her return will heal the wounds her disappearance created. But Emma is vastly different from the sunny toddler they remember. She barely remembers her parents or her older sisters. She is quiet and withdrawn, and, worst of all, longs for the very people who kidnapped her.

    Vickie says: "Too Dramatic!"
    "no payoff"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I'm a mother of a beautiful toddler girl. I should really have been an emotional mess listening to a story about the aftermath of a toddler girl snatched at age 3 and not returned to her family for 2 years.

    Somehow, the author manages to avoid forging a connection between the reader and any of the characters. The mother character, Megan, is so unpleasant and makes so little sense that even her kids in the story don't want to be around her and her friends walk on eggshells because anything can set her off, and she doesn't feel like she has to be fair to anyone at all, even as she whines "that's not FAIR" to pretty much every other character more than once. Maybe that's true to life, but it doesn't make a compelling protagonist. The father shows inexplicably boundless compassion to one of the kidnappers and, although more sympathetic, is too one-dimensional to truly engage the listener.

    I read a little about this book because it is confusing just to jump in. Turns out it is a sequel in a self-published set of four novels that was a hit in book clubs, clubs which I can only surmise had at least one member without any critical reading skills and an overabundance of forgiveness for bad writing choosing the book. I would die of alcohol poisoning if I had to take a shot every time "it broke his/her heart," but I would stay sober if I didn't have to drink during "it broke her heart...it hurt." As in, "it broke her heart to hear him say that. It hurt to know that is what he thought." Then, "it wasn't FAIR."

    Oh, Lord, such a boring and actually irritating book. Irritating for what it should have been, with such a naturally compelling story. But it is plotted too poorly to enable the listener to sustain disbelief. One of the most glaring holes, which I couldn't believe until it was explicitly laid out, is that the surviving kidnapper, an elderly man married to the demented, now-deceased woman who had done the actual snatching, seemed to genuinely believe that his Alzheimer's-riddled wife just showed up one day with a 3 year old, with no clothes or papers, and that child was his granddaughter. "Hey honey, I'm home! Look what I got! It's a grandchild for us! Nevermind that she keeps crying for mommy and is absolutely terrified!" And all the times her journal was quoted where she says "this time, I'll do it right. This girl is my second chance." The guy is criminally stupid if he really believed it, and just plain criminal if he didn't. Either way, he belongs in jail, no matter how bad he feels now.

    Reading this review, I guess that the book did arouse passion in me after listening to it. Passionate dislike and annoyance that I wasted hours of my life, though, probably aren't the reactions the author was looking for. Save your money.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Private

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By James Patterson, Maxine Paetro
    • Narrated By Peter Hermann
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1712)
    Performance
    (1045)
    Story
    (1042)

    Former Marine helicopter pilot Jack Morgan runs Private, a renowned investigation company with branches around the globe. It is where you go when you need maximum force and maximum discretion. The secrets of the most influential men and women on the planet come to Jack daily - and his staff of investigators uses the world's most advanced forensic tools to make and break their cases.

    Meaghan says: "private"
    "Fast moving cliches stave off boredom for awhile"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It's got what you expect from a Patterson novel: action, fast pace, a tortured (former military) hero named Jack, titillating mysteries/side stories, and murder. It's really not special, really not terrible. Well, not terrible in a bad way.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Reluctant Queen: The Love Story of Esther

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Joan Wolf
    • Narrated By Brooke Sanford
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (91)
    Performance
    (82)
    Story
    (82)

    You've read it as a biblical tale of courage. Experience it anew as a heart-stirring love story. She was a simple girl faced with an impossible choice. He was a magnificent king with a lonely heart. Their love was the divine surprise that changed the course of history. The beloved story of Esther springs to fresh life in this inspired novel that vibrates with mystery, intrigue and romance.

    Amazon Customer says: "Good story - very good narrator"
    "historical romance fiction"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The author re-imagines the Book of Ester as a love story. It is fun listening, even if the characters all feel sort of one-dimensional. It's not like the Bible is full of subtlety. (I've read a lot of the old testament. Jews good, others bad!) The author makes a credible stab at giving a human back story to the characters of the Bible, but she admits that it isn't faithful to the Bible's book, so don't listen to this instead of doing your theology homework.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Secret Daughter

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By Shilpi Somaya Gowda
    • Narrated By Soneela Nankani
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (254)
    Performance
    (188)
    Story
    (189)

    Debut novelist Shilpi Somaya Gowda pens this compelling tale about two families, worlds apart, linked by one Indian child. After giving birth to a girl for a second time, impoverished Kavita must give her up to an orphanage. The baby, named Asha, is adopted by an American doctor and raised in California. But once grown, Asha decides to return to India.

    Stephanie says: "A Must Read"
    "the author revises the planet"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The story is one of family relationships, specifically mother-daughter relationships. But she is too heavy-handed in her focus, using a sweeper brush instead of a fine point. She also writes NorCal culture in the 1990s as if no Indian people or subculture exists - this Indian adoptee has never eaten Indian food? Really? Or been to Fremont? Or heard of waxing? My uncle lived in Menlo Park from 1985 - 2003, and I can tell you this reeks of invention.

    The author then pretends you can see through the air of Bangalore all the way to the sea. In 2004. And that you can take taxis there and not hit bad traffic.

    These patent fabrications reinforce the feeling of artificiality that pervades the women's relationships with one another as well. It was a nice try, but really suffered from the forced details she made up trying to make the story more dramatic. It did not feel like it could be true, and the people didn't feel like they could be true, so when the latest emotional tragedy struck I found it hard to be moved.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Damocles

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 33 mins)
    • By S. G. Redling
    • Narrated By Angela Dawe
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (170)
    Performance
    (162)
    Story
    (158)

    When Earth is rocked by evidence that extraterrestrials may have seeded human DNA throughout the universe, a one-way expedition into deep space is mounted to uncover the truth. What linguist Meg Dupris and her crewmates aboard the Earth ship Damocles discover on Didet - a planet bathed in the near-eternal daylight of seven suns - is a humanoid race with a different language, a different look, and a surprisingly similar society. But here, it’s the "Earthers" who are the extraterrestrial invaders, and it’s up to Meg - a woman haunted by tragedy and obsessed with the power of communication - to find the key to establishing trust between the natives and the newcomers.

    Kathy says: "Swimming against the current!"
    "Ruined in the last two chapters"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book starts out really promisingly, with vivid characters that are well fleshed out - even the tangental ones. I also like that an Asian man is a sexy love interest. The crew of the Damocles is forced to make premature First Contact with the occupants of the planet Didet when something goes wrong with their ship. They make the most of it, developing relationships and sharing technologies while the setup enables the author to explore a culture strikingly similar to our own. The setup then becomes using aliens as a device to explore intercultural relations and the fragile balance inherent in such.

    Then the last two chapters come, and they clash stunningly with the chapters before. Not really the main characters, but the side characters who are suddenly used to maneuver the book into a sequel. Basically, the end has an unnecessary confession of a personal tragedy (as stated in the blurb, this isn't a spoiler) to pull at our emotions, then a manufactured crisis whose ending makes no sense and is inconsistent with the facts as presented, but does serve to launch the crew into another book and another adventure. As a listener, I was insulted. It's hard to give details without spoiling it, but you know how some sci fi conveniently forgets inherent human logic and even its own back story when it wants to advance some drama? That's what happens. Brought the story down from four to three stars in my opinion. I'm still sort of mad, and it's been days since I listened.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Marked: House of Night Series, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 35 mins)
    • By P. C. Cast, Kristin Cast
    • Narrated By Edwina Wren
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1297)
    Performance
    (680)
    Story
    (686)

    Sixteen-year-old Zoey Redbird has just been Marked as a fledgling vampire and joins the House of Night, a school where she will train to become an adult vampire. That is, if she makes it through the Change - and not all of those who are Marked do. It sucks to begin a new life, especially away from her friends, and on top of that, Zoey is no ordinary fledgling. She has been chosen as special by the vampire Goddess Nyx.

    Forest says: "Warning, *Young adult*"
    "Nothing jibes with the story"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Look at the cover. Pretty white girl. Listen to the book. Pretty dark Cherokee girl.

    Listen to the narrator. She can't hide her Australian accent. Listen to the words of the book. Oklahoma accent.

    These may seem to be nit-picky, but they are extremely distracting because the dissonance between what you hear and see and what you are being told pulls you out of the story. Not that the story is anything special. Latest in the supernatural young adult genre. I wonder if there is any YA that *isn't* supernatural nowadays?

    This will probably be made into a movie.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Firing Point

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 35 mins)
    • By George Wallace, Don Keith
    • Narrated By Stefan Rudnicki
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (33)
    Performance
    (30)
    Story
    (31)

    At the top of the world… at the bottom of the sea… a war has begun. Below the polar ice cap, an American nuclear submarine moves quietly in the frigid water, tailing a new Russian sub. But the usual, unspoken game of hide-and-seek between opposing captains ends when the Americans hear sounds of disaster and flooding, and the Russian sub sinks at a depth of a thousand feet. The American sub rushes to help, only to join its former quarry in the deep. The situation ignites tensions around the world.

    Jean says: "good submarine story"
    "packed with action"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    At first, I was startled by how deep the narrator's voice is. But since most of the characters are men, this is actually fine and lends the right air to this military action drama.

    It must have been much easier for writers during the Cold War. There was one enemy: Communists (Russia or China would do, though in the 80s hermetic China seemed like a flyspeck in the world scene). So pick a villain, paint him red, and watch our American heroes save the day.

    This book bridges from the Cold War to the modern day by making the Russian villain a traitor to his own democratic government, and the Russian president a weak, pro-West, and good-hearted figure. It then careens about the planet, jumping from subs to military bases to the NYSE and all around again. Each short scene is packed with action and plot development.

    You won't be bored reading this book. The submarine scenes seem well researched (indeed, the first author is a retired sub captain). I'm not sure I believe all of the political moves, and no one in the book has apparently heard of Wikileaks or the internet. I like it when things tie up neatly, as the scenes in this book do, so it's hard to complain that some characters seem motivated by advancing an exciting storyline or that all the military dudes have unerring gut instinct.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Circle

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Dave Eggers
    • Narrated By Dion Graham
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (865)
    Performance
    (787)
    Story
    (797)

    When Mae Holland is hired to work for the Circle, the world's most powerful internet company, she feels she's been given the opportunity of a lifetime. The Circle, run out of a sprawling California campus, links users' personal emails, social media, banking, and purchasing with their universal operating system, resulting in one online identity and a new age of civility and transparency. As Mae tours the open-plan office spaces, the towering glass dining facilities, the cozy dorms for those who spend nights at work, she is thrilled with the company's modernity and activity.

    Darwin8u says: "A solid, just not great social network dystopia"
    "1984, reworked for 2013"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I've never read Eggers before. In this novel, he puts together a story that delivers his message cleverly, if occasionally ham-handedly (we get the animal metaphor long before he has a character explain it).

    The internet and modern culture's exhibitionism means that the universal death of privacy is imminent and possibly unstoppable. You will be assimilated. In this case, in the near yet unspecified future, this is by a company called The Circle, whose Bay Area campus sounds like a 20-year-old tech CEO's dream. The protagonist, Mae, represents us the sheeple who thoughtlessly overshare online. She drinks the Kool-Aid, quickly learning that the yawning, desperate loneliness of her life can be papered over with artificial metrics, such as the number of "smiles" followers send in or job ratings that seem to only range from 96 to 100. The book traces the evolution of Mae and her family, who don't want to live online, as The Circle relentlessly removes all other options.

    This book is mostly 1984 with a touch of Animal Farm thrown in. There are a lot of unbelievable portions, but then, it's not believable that pigs will walk on their hind legs and strike a deal with farmers. It's all for metaphor. This book is a good read for people who think about the rapid change the internet has already brought to society. It's probably a better read for people who don't think about that at all.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

CANCEL

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.