You no longer follow Emily

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Emily

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Emily

Field: clinical psychology. Hispanohablante & lusófona.

New York, NY, United States | Member Since 2009

0
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 1 reviews
  • 1 ratings
  • 178 titles in library
  • 0 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
0

  • The Book of Night Women

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 47 mins)
    • By Marlon James
    • Narrated By Robin Miles
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (450)
    Performance
    (224)
    Story
    (228)

    The story of Lilith, born into slavery on a Jamaican sugar plantation at the end of the 18th century. Even at her birth, the slave women around her recognize a dark power that they - and she - will come to both revere and fear. The Night Women, as they call themselves, have long been plotting a slave revolt, and as Lilith comes of age and reveals the extent of her power, they see her as the key to their plans.

    A User says: "read now to understand the past"
    "read now to understand the past"
    Overall

    I have never come across a work of fiction that so powerfully portrayed the moral complexities of European slavery as James's novel. In this book, slave owners and slaves alike are complex characters: the family whose slaves are the "best dressed in all Jamaica" also cruelly kills its slaves on the slightest whim; house slaves and field slaves distrust and despise each other; and an Irish overseer is the only person who treats the book's main character, the mulatta Lilith, as a human being. What conclusions can we draw from this book? Slavery was an institution that corrupted the lives of all that it touched, White or Black, free or slave. And for those who doubt that its ramifications continue into the present day, read this book!

    16 of 16 people found this review helpful
  • The Indian Clerk

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By David Leavitt
    • Narrated By Graeme Malcom
    Overall
    (99)
    Performance
    (52)
    Story
    (55)

    Based on the remarkable true story of G. H. Hardy and Srinivasa Ramanujan, and populated with such luminaries such as D. H. Lawrence, Bertrand Russell, and Ludwig Wittgenstein, The Indian Clerk takes this extraordinary slice of history and transforms it into an emotional and spellbinding story about the fragility of human connection and our need to find order in the world.

    Susianna says: "Too Graphic for My Taste"
    "mathematics and longing"
    Overall

    The narrator of "The Indian Clerk" is a reserved, gay mathematician (G. Hardy, a historical figure) from a middle-class background who, despite belonging to one of the most elite intellectual societies of his day, always feel a bit out-of-place in pre-WWI Cambridge. With a fellow mathematician, he manages to bring an obscure Indian mathematical genius, Ramanujan, to study and work at Cambridge. The book is a nostalgic account of an imagine relationship between the two men, one English, one Indian, who are united by their love of mathematics and divided by their cultural differences. A superb depiction of the pre-WWI and WWI era (one of my favorites to read about), as well as a bittersweet tale of a man's love for another.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.