Call anytime(888) 283-5051
 

You no longer follow Anthony

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Anthony

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Anthony

NM, NM, United States | Member Since 2009

ratings
9
REVIEWS
3
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
0
HELPFUL VOTES
0

  • The Buddha in the Attic

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Julie Otsuka
    • Narrated By Samantha Quan, Carrington MacDuffie
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (124)
    Performance
    (106)
    Story
    (106)

    In eight incantatory sections, The Buddha in the Attic traces the extraordinary lives of young Japanese brides, from their arduous journey by boat, where they exchange photographs of their husbands, imagining uncertain futures in an unknown land; to their arrival in San Francisco and their tremulous first nights as new wives; to their backbreaking work picking fruit in the fields and scrubbing the floors of white women; to their struggles to master a new language and a new culture; to their experiences in childbirth, and then as mothers....

    Lydia says: "Fascinating topic, irritating writing style"
    "I enjoyed this true story immensely"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Where does The Buddha in the Attic rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    A young woman tells her own story, through the lives of her Japanese mothers and grandmothers, who moved to America in order to marry Japanese men that had gone before. Like Walt Whitman, sometimes she tells her story by vignettes, in a few words, or a sentence, listed one after another, that glimpse life in this strange new land.

    Somehow, it was constantly surprising to hear the California middle class towns identified as home to a people still rooted in the old country. America was the land of opportunity. The women were often, maybe more often than not, rudely surprised by what they found when they came to America. But their families made it clear they could never return, that there was no more home for them in Japan. So, having made a choice, or their family having made a choice for them, they simply do whatever is necessary in order to survive. They usually marry the men they contracted for, and put up with them, warts and all. The author makes no effort to present the women as angels; just as hardworking, unquestioning, obedient, partners to their husbands. The story shifts gradually to the Japanese people as a whole in America, who made the best of a new world, became functioning and integral parts of their communities, and were rewarded with distrust and alienation during WW II. Yet, her story gleams with gentleness, caring for her people and regretting not an instant that she is American.


    What does Samantha Quan and Carrington MacDuffie bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Most of the Audible readers do a wonderful job, and these readers were no different. They keep the story moving, injecting feeling, characterization, and rhythm to the story. I read about a book a week on Kindle, but I absorb books nearly as quickly on audible, listening at every opportunity. In this story, it is a woman's story, told through the voices of women, gentle, but unsparing, not in the least pointlessly sweet or adorned.


    Any additional comments?

    I have listened to two other books since this one, but the sweet thoughtfulness of the story, the relentless telling of the lives of others in diamond flashes rather than long biographies, the sense of an entire people trying so hard to be accepted, will live on for me for a long time.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Dinner: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Herman Koch, Sam Garrett (translator)
    • Narrated By Clive Mantle
    Overall
    (925)
    Performance
    (812)
    Story
    (817)

    It's a summer's evening in Amsterdam, and two couples meet at a fashionable restaurant for dinner. Between mouthfuls of food and over the polite scrapings of cutlery, the conversation remains a gentle hum of polite discourse - the banality of work, the triviality of the holidays. But behind the empty words, terrible things need to be said, and with every forced smile and every new course, the knives are being sharpened. Each couple has a 15-year-old son. The two boys are united by their accountability for a single horrific act; an act that has triggered a police investigation and shattered the comfortable, insulated worlds of their families.

    Jane says: "Dining at its most distubing"
    "One of the best, most consistent, most powerful re"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you listen to The Dinner again? Why?

    I listened to it twice in a row. Such a fascinating, perverted, upside down story. And Mr. Mantle was perfection itself in characterizing the narrator of the story - breezy, disconnected, sure, and clueless all at the same time.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Light Between Oceans: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By M. L. Stedman
    • Narrated By Noah Taylor
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1233)
    Performance
    (1085)
    Story
    (1068)

    In 1918, after four harrowing years on the Western Front, Tom Sherbourne returns to Australia to take a job as the lighthouse keeper on remote Janus Rock. To this isolated island, where the supply boat comes only four times a year and shore leaves are granted every other year at best, Tom brings a young, bold, and loving wife, Isabel.

    Sandra says: "Wonderful story.....terrible narrator."
    "Wonderful story; boring narration"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you love best about The Light Between Oceans?

    I'm halfway through the first half of the narration. The story is lovely. The narrator sounds like he's in a hurry to get to an appointment, he couldn't be more bored with the story, and he just wants to get through it before the football game starts. I'm going to have to give up on the narration and go read the Kindle version.


    Would you be willing to try another one of Noah Taylor’s performances?

    Not even


    Any additional comments?

    Audible should have known that this narrator just is not skilled. There is not a lot of characterization available in the reading, but Mr. Taylor seems to think his job is just to read all the words in a monotone, quickly, then get on with something else.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

CANCEL

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.