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jeanette

Little Rock, AR

little Rock, AR, United States | Member Since 2009

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  • 1 reviews
  • 4 ratings
  • 1 titles in library
  • 0 purchased in 2014
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  • A Lesson in Secrets: A Maisie Dobbs Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Jacqueline Winspear
    • Narrated By Orlagh Cassidy
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (503)
    Performance
    (351)
    Story
    (351)

    In the summer of 1932, Maisie Dobbs' career takes an exciting new turn when she accepts an undercover assignment directed by Scotland Yard's Special Branch and the Secret Service. Posing as a junior lecturer, she is sent to a private college in Cambridge to monitor any activities "not in the interests of His Majesty's government". She soon finds herself investigating a web of activities being conducted by the emerging Nazi Party.

    Jeanette Finan says: "A worthy edition to the series"
    "A worthy edition to the series"
    Overall

    In this book Masie is asked by the Secret Service to take a job at Cambridge as a Philosophy professor at a college dedicated to the furthering of peace. Masie is tasked with the job of finding out if the staff or students are part of the Communist party and are engaged in activities that are a threat to the Government.

    Maisie is not there more than a day or two before a man is murdered and Scotland Yard is called into investigate. Maisie engages in a delicate dance between investigating subversives for the Secret Service and assisting Scotland Yard (unasked) solve the murder. Maisie turns up a group of students sympathetic to the growing SDP in Germany and warns the Secret Service about their activities. The Secret Service is more concerned with ferreting out Communists than they are Fascists and this creates a certain amount of conflict between Maisie and the SS. At that point my brain switched over to real life and I remembered that it was in just this very period in time that Trinity College in Cambridge was the place that The Cambridge Five met and were recruited by the Soviets and became the most effective espionage agents against the British and American interests in the history of spydom. Using 20/20 hindsight perhaps the SS and Winspear should have expanded Maisies mission to include both groups. But then no one had a clue at the time that that nest of vipers was forming its self so I guess being clueless is appropriate.

    This book is not heavy on plot. The main mystery was the murder and the spy hunt merely peripheral it seemed to me. Meantime, back at the ranch (London) another mystery develops and is left to Billy to investigate. I thought that much more could have been done with this mystery but perhaps Winspear thought Maisie had her hands to full already.

    But is was a lovely visit into Maisie's world. Winspear is a master at creating an atmosphere that drips with authenticity and her secondary characters new and old are always credible

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • Coming Home

    • ABRIDGED (6 hrs and 15 mins)
    • By Rosamunde Pilcher
    • Narrated By Lynn Redgrave
    Overall
    (77)
    Performance
    (35)
    Story
    (36)

    Five years in the writing, Coming Home is the tale Rosamunde Pilcher believes to be the capstone of a lifetime of writing. Her most ambitious and compelling work yet, Coming Home is a vast canvas, and a vividly drawn portrait of an era close to us in time, yet now disappeared. Like The Shell Seekers, Coming Home is an intensely personal story. Like September, it teems with marvelous, memorable characters. Coming Home is a story to be savored, an old-fashioned tale hardly anyone knows how to tell anymore. In telling the story of Judith Dunbar and her loved ones, Rosamunde Pilcher describes each family member with warmth, wisdom and clear-eyed insight. Coming Home is a totally involving story of a young woman's coming of age, coming to terms with both love and sadness, and, in every sense of the word, Coming Home.

    Nora says: "Good News, Bad News"
    "Whose bright idea was it to add background music?"
    Overall

    As abridged versions of books go Coming Home was pretty good except for the awful tinny background music. I think it was meant to set a mood but all it did for me was to set my teeth on edge. I would have happily spent more for an unabridged version as this was the best book Pilcher wrote.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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