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Michael

East Peoria, IL, United States | Member Since 2005

ratings
688
REVIEWS
77
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
8
HELPFUL VOTES
302

  • A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 19 mins)
    • By Daniel H. Pink
    • Narrated By Daniel H. Pink
    Overall
    (1376)
    Performance
    (545)
    Story
    (556)

    Lawyers. Accountants. Software Engineers. That what Mom and Dad encouraged us to become. They were wrong. Gone is the age of "left-brain" dominance. The future belongs to a different kind of person with a different kind of mind: designers, inventors, teachers, storytellers - creative and emphatic "right-brain" thinkers whose abilities mark the fault line between who gets ahead and who doesn't.

    Frank says: "On the precipice of genius (not quite)..."
    "more questions than answers"
    Overall

    First, Daniel Pink is right about IT jobs going overseas. The only IT most people will need created are web pages which are graphical. But how does he figure that 150 million people are going to be gainfully employed in graphical arts. It is also true that people need to have the ability to piece together small insignificant facts and grasp the big picture from them in order to do business and be successful, but this has always been a requirement. Right? It is also true that people need to almagamate different and sometimes disparate skills in order to gain success, but this also is nothing new. After listening if one were to read my comments they might think that I missed the point of the book, but, I get it, and the book is interesting enough but it is not awe inspiring or super insightful by any stretch of the imagination. Check it out if you are interested but don't go out of your way.

    21 of 23 people found this review helpful
  • The China Study: The Most Comprehensive Study of Nutrition Ever Conducted and the Startling Implications for Diet, Weight Loss, And Long-term Health

    • ABRIDGED (7 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By T. Colin Campbell, Thomas M. Campbell
    • Narrated By Stefan Rudnicki
    Overall
    (811)
    Performance
    (518)
    Story
    (529)

    The China Study offers conclusive evidence that a change of diet can dramatically reduce the risks of heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. The book is based on the most comprehensive study of nutrition ever conducted, a 20-year joint project between Cornell University, Oxford University, and the Chinese Academy of Preventive Medicine. The study surveyed the eating habits of 6,500 adults from all over China and Taiwan and found a direct correlation between diet and disease.

    James says: "Deserves a second listen"
    "I have never read a more life changing book"
    Overall

    This book has convinced me to change my eating habits. I have never read such an important book besides the Bible. This for me has become dietary gospel. I can't say enough good things about this book and the research, and I truly hope that heart disease is reversible because lord knows what I have done to my heart over the past 33 years.

    Do yourself the biggest favor you'll ever do yourself......READ THIS BOOK!!!!!!!!!

    2 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • The Divided Mind

    • ABRIDGED (6 hrs and 23 mins)
    • By John E. Sarno
    • Narrated By Paul Hecht, James Boles
    Overall
    (150)
    Performance
    (48)
    Story
    (49)

    The Divided Mind is the crowning achievement of Dr. John E. Sarno's long and successful career as a groundbreaking medical pioneer. While his earlier books dealt almost exclusively with musculoskeletal pain disorders, here Dr. Sarno addresses the entire spectrum of psychosomatic (mind-body) disorders.

    Alexandra says: "mind/body connection"
    "TMS should get more recognition"
    Overall

    It's all in your head. Well at least a large portion of it is in your head. Dr. Sarno's TMS hypothesis just makes sense. If you were to combine Dr. Sarno's recommended treatment for muscular pain with the dietary advice from "The China Study" written by Dr. Campbell, then you would have a winning combination for a healthy and pain free life.

    I think that a little Prozac, maybe some cyclobenzaprine, quite a few prayers to Jesus, a mostly non-animal product diet, a smoke free and booze free lifestyle, and some psychotherapy can go a long way to solving most peoples pain problems. I'm no doctor, but I do very intense manual labor and this combination has done miracles for me, and I haven't found a physician yet who would refute my winning combination, though there might be a few surgeons that would be disappointed at the loss of business. In the long run it will save you and your insurance company a hell of a lot of money to do a few simple things. Even if you take out the psychotherapy and talk to a priest or pastor instead....all the rest of my suggestions are pretty much low cost or no cost. If you don't like praying to Jesus or Allah, then Buddhist meditations are said to work very well also, they just take more concentration than I can muster; it's all the same brain mechanisms at work no matter whether you pray or meditate and it is all said to be beneficial no matter what book you read.

    At any rate, non-Dr. Mike will get back to the book review, so any-who, this book was very helpful. Half of all injuries have no identifiable cause, but Dr. Sarno and his Freudian approach gives a treatment to this unknown other half. I also strongly, very strongly recommend reading "The China Study". The combination of these two books will change your health and your life for the better if you implement them into your lifestyle.

    7 of 8 people found this review helpful
  • Fingerprints of God: The Search for the Science of Spirituality

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Barbara Bradley Hagerty
    • Narrated By Cassandra Campbell
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (139)
    Performance
    (33)
    Story
    (35)

    In Fingerprints of God, award-winning journalist Barbara Bradley Hagerty delves into the discoveries science is making about how faith and spirituality affect us physically and emotionally as it attempts to understand whether the ineffable place beyond this world can be rationally - even scientifically - explained. Hagerty interviews some of the world's top scientists to describe what their groundbreaking research reveals about our human spiritual experience.

    Michael says: "Beautifully written"
    "Beautifully written"
    Overall

    In the pop-psychology genre there aren't a lot of women authors. Women think differently from men in a good many ways; so the amazing thing about this book, in my opinion, is that only a woman could have written a book about this subject and have done it in such a beautiful way. The hard science behind God is obviously non-existent, but does that mean that he/she is non-existent. Well that is for each individual to decide for his or herself. I recommend listening to this book if you are interested in this question and a few others. This lady does a good analysis of this subject from a semi-scientific point of view and she uses a woman's natural empathy to write a splendid pop-psychology book.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • The Last Centurion

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By John Ringo
    • Narrated By Dan John Miller
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (353)
    Performance
    (176)
    Story
    (178)

    In the second decade of the 21st century, the world is struck by two catastrophes: a new mini-ice age and a plague to dwarf all previous experiences. Rising out of the disaster is the character known to history as "Bandit Six", an American Army officer caught up in the struggle to rebuild the world and prevent the fall of his homeland - despite the best efforts of politicians, both elected and military.

    Lindsay says: "Enjoy the story and forget the politics"
    "I counldn't stop listening"
    Overall

    John Ringo was in the military something like 30 years ago, but he describes modern weapon systems and light armored vehicle maneuvers, etc. to such a high degree of expertise that you would think that he got out of the military two years ago. I really appreciate that degree of accuracy. As far as the being in the Army itself goes, whether it be 30 years ago or 20 years from now, some things stay the same no matter what, and there really are officers like Bandit 6, and there are good and bad BC's, and there are grunts, tech soldiers, and Fobits, and Remps and on down the line. Me I was a grunt at first and then I turned into a fobit. He described what happens to fobits stuck on FOB's perfectly, but what makes a soldier one thing or another is only dependent on what MOS he chooses when he is at the MEPS. With the right training most grunts could be just as good of mechanics as most mechanics and vice versa. So all the distinctions of suck are sort of arbitrary. Anyways its a good book, right wing or not.

    2 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA

    • UNABRIDGED (21 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Tim Weiner
    • Narrated By Stefan Rudnicki
    Overall
    (1997)
    Performance
    (597)
    Story
    (595)

    This is the book the CIA does not want you to read. For the last 60 years, the CIA has maintained a formidable reputation in spite of its terrible record, never disclosing its blunders to the American public. It spun its own truth to the nation while reality lay buried in classified archives. Now, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter Tim Weiner offers a stunning indictment of the CIA, a deeply flawed organization that has never deserved America's confidence.

    Michael says: "Flawed but Important"
    "They suceeded believe it or not"
    Overall

    It is easy to take a select number of anecdotes of failure and paint a big picture that the CIA was a huge waste of resources and that it failed to prevent or predict every big event to happen in the previous 65 years of world history, but I believe that they succeeded. How they succeeded through happenstance was to prevent the cold war from turning hot. They did this by building relationships and communication links with the USSR and with our allies during the Cold War.

    The CIA may have missed predicting certain major events in world history over the previous 65 years, but the nature of military and political intelligence is not clairvoyance. An intelligence analyst is not a fortune teller. I'll even bet that within the organization there were people who made adequate and very accurate predictions for the major events that the CIA is accused of missing, but the nature of reporting to U.S. Presidents and other politicians is political. This means that the reporter tells the politician what they want to hear. If you go telling them what they don't want to hear, wrong or right, you will be replaced.

    So don't blame this Agency for failures that it is not responsible for. Blame the culture surrounding the Office of the Presidency, and that of the Congress. Therein lies your problem.

    5 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • The Folk of the Fringe

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By Orson Scott Card
    • Narrated By Scott Brick, Stefan Rudnicki, Emily Janice Card, and others
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (171)
    Performance
    (41)
    Story
    (39)

    Only a few nuclear weapons fell. But in the chaos of famine and plague, there existed a few pockets of order. The strongest of them was the state of Deseret. The climate has changed, and the lake has filled up. There, on the fringes, brave, hardworking pioneers are making the desert bloom again.

    Sam says: "Short Story Collection"
    "Curious subject"
    Overall

    There was a time before the end of the Cold War when post-nuclear holocaust books were everywhere. How humanity and civilization moved on after the bomb was a big subject in fantasy writing. Muties and bands of pirate robbers and cannibals abounded through fiction. This book took that subject matter, which was once so popular, and twisted it to fit the point of view of the persecuted Mormon people. In the beginning of the book the Baptists of Greensboro massacred the Mormons of Greensboro and survivors were forced to move to Utah were law and order still presided. Interesting enough. It would be awfully offensive subject matter if you were a Baptists or an "Evangelical Christian". I wonder if the Greensboro Baptist did anything to the Greensboro Catholics or the Greensboro Jehovah's Witnesses. There are Christian Sects that exists that the Baptist find more offensive than the Mormons. Mr. Card didn't mention any of these. I do think that if there were six bombs dropped and civilization crumbled soon after there would be a lot more racial tension in the Southeast U.S. than the author believed to be the case. It's funny to me that the author thinks the Mormons would be persecuted 20 years ago, but just two years ago the Republicans almost had a Mormon candidate for President. Of course, it was the far right block of Christian Conservative Republicans who threw their weight behind McCain, but if McCain hadn't been there it could have very well been Romney who received the nomination. Obviously, the Mormons aren't as objectionable in the American mainstream as the author would like to believe. They're not exactly persecuted or outcast in America. To me they seem to be a wealthy, highly educated, well-mannered, if not slightly brainwashed group of people. But they are not objectionable as a religious group. I would at least place them above the Muslims as far as religious likability goes. But this subject explored in length in this book makes it interes

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Ender in Exile

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 47 mins)
    • By Orson Scott Card
    • Narrated By Stefan Rudnicki, David Birney, Cassandra Campbell, and others
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2195)
    Performance
    (1105)
    Story
    (1111)

    Andrew Wiggin is told that he can no longer live on Earth, and he realizes that this is the truth. He has become far more than just a boy who won a game: he is the Savior of Earth, a hero, a military genius whose allegiance is sought by every nation of the newly shattered Earth Hegemony. He is offered the choice of living in isolation on Eros, at one of the Hegemony's training facilities, but instead the 12-year-old chooses to leave his home world and begin the long relativistic journey out to the colonies.

    Joshua says: "A Change of Perspective"
    "Excellent, Excellent, Excellent"
    Overall

    This is a most worthy sequel to Ender's Game, and probably is one of the best science fiction books in science fiction history. It is fantastic story.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • The Power of Now

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By Eckhart Tolle
    • Narrated By Eckhart Tolle
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3358)
    Performance
    (1373)
    Story
    (1343)

    To make the journey into The Power of Now you need to leave your analytical mind and its false created self, the ego, behind. Access to the Now is everywhere - in the body, the silence, and the space all around you. These are the keys to enter a state of inner peace.

    annhere says: "AWE INSPIRING!"
    "Oprah was right with this one"
    Overall

    Eckhart Tolle has such a soothing voice. I think that this is why the audio book was so pleasurable to listen to. It was relaxing. The teachings of Mr. Tolle are fairly standard Buddhists/new age/self help doctrines. His ideas about pain bodies becoming traps that people get locked into and eventually come to rely on is such a clever way of explaining what he calls the "insanity" of most peoples existence. I recently listened to another book that is focused on using Christian doctrine to overcome pain bodies. "The Sacred Romance" described pain bodies as arrows. I would recommend both books using "The Power of Now" first and "The Sacred Romance" second if you are wanting to approach the subject of consciousness from a christian perspective. I noticed in Eckhart Tolle's online reviews he received a lot of criticism from christian readers because he does not profess the gospel. These are valid criticisms, however, there is still a great deal of useful and thought provoking information in this book, and the author has such a pleasant voice.

    1 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Screwed: The Undeclared War Against the Middle Class - and What We Can Do About It

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Thom Hartmann
    • Narrated By Anthony Heald
    Overall
    (162)
    Performance
    (64)
    Story
    (67)

    Our founding fathers worked hard to ensure that a small group of wealthy people would never dominate this country. Thomas Jefferson believed that our very democracy depends upon our ability to play referee to the game of business, protecting labor and the public good. But over the last 25 years, we've witnessed an undeclared war against the middle class.

    Jose says: "A must read"
    "Amen, Amen, Amen"
    Overall

    If you were to go back and read my numerous reviews that run the course of four years, it would be easy to accuse me of being a Ayn Rand Conservative. However, since the BAILOUT by H.W.Bush, I have had a huge change of heart, and I now see the light. I am among the working poor and everyday I feel screwed. However, I should bite my tongue seeing as how I am fortunate enough to actually have a job. There are people out there even more screwed. This book tells us why we are screwed.

    12 of 14 people found this review helpful
  • Starship: Mutiny

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 35 mins)
    • By Mike Resnick
    • Narrated By Jonathan Davis, Mike Resnick
    Overall
    (507)
    Performance
    (182)
    Story
    (186)

    The date is 1966 of the Galactic Era, almost three thousand years from now, and the Republic, created by the human race - but not yet dominated by it - finds itself in an all-out war. They stand against the Teroni Federation, an alliance of races that resent Man's growing military and economic power. The main battles are taking place in the Spiral Arm and toward the Core. But far out on the Rim, the Theodore Roosevelt is one of three ships charged with protecting the Phoenix Cluster.

    Eivind says: "Move along, nothing to see here"
    "It's Good"
    Overall

    This is a fun series. Podunk deserved to be deposed.

    1 of 4 people found this review helpful

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