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Matthew

CAMARGO, OK, United States | Member Since 2009

ratings
246
REVIEWS
6
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
0
HELPFUL VOTES
38

  • Ivanhoe

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 2 mins)
    • By Walter Scott
    • Narrated By Simon Prebble
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (80)
    Performance
    (57)
    Story
    (59)

    The epitome of the chivalric novel, Ivanhoe sweeps listeners into Medieval England and the lives of a memorable cast of characters. Ivanhoe, a trusted ally of Richard the Lion Hearted, returns from the Crusades to reclaim his inheritance. Rebecca, a beautiful Jewish woman, is defended by Ivanhoe against a charge of witchcraft - but it is Lady Rowena who is Ivanhoe's true love. The success of this novel lies with Scott's skillful blend of historic reality, chivalric romance, and high adventure.

    Matthew says: "Excellent writing, excellent narration!"
    "Excellent writing, excellent narration!"
    Overall

    Ivanhoe is really one of the best listens on Audible. Scott's wit, story-telling, and personal narration are perfect. Prebble's narration is at its best. This work is so obviously an influence on many of my favorite authors. Interestingly enough, one author that most resembles Scott (purposefully) in style, Susanna Clarke, also has Simon Prebble read her books: Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrel; and parts of her Ladies of Grace Adieu (I recommend both). Prebble is spot-on, and Scot is very enjoyable to read. Ivanhoe is most highly recommended.

    11 of 11 people found this review helpful
  • The Story of Human Language

    • ORIGINAL (18 hrs and 15 mins)
    • By The Great Courses
    • Narrated By Professor John McWhorter
    Overall
    (165)
    Performance
    (157)
    Story
    (153)

    Language defines us as a species, placing humans head and shoulders above even the most proficient animal communicators. But it also beguiles us with its endless mysteries, allowing us to ponder why different languages emerged, why there isn't simply a single language, how languages change over time and whether that's good or bad, and how languages die out and become extinct.

    Saud says: "You'll Never Look at Languages the Same Way Again"
    "Wonderfully informative, eye-opening, funny."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Where does The Story of Human Language rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    In the top 5 for nonfiction!


    What other book might you compare The Story of Human Language to and why?

    So informative, yet so enjoyable, I would compare it to Bill Bryson. Only, rather than a travelogue sprinkled with humor and mishaps, this is a journey through time, touching different places and peoples around the globe.


    What about Professor John McWhorter’s performance did you like?

    I love Professor McWhorter's obvious passion for his subject and his surprising sense of humor.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Screwtape Letters

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By C.S. Lewis
    • Narrated By Ralph Cosham
    Overall
    (1982)
    Performance
    (1077)
    Story
    (1097)

    A masterpiece of satire, this classic has entertained and enlightened readers the world over with its sly and ironic portrayal of human life and foibles from the vantage point of Screwtape, a highly placed assistant to "Our Father Below". At once wildly comic, deadly serious, and strikingly original, C.S. Lewis gives us the correspondence of the worldly-wise old Devil to his nephew, Wormwood, a novice demon in charge of securing the damnation of an ordinary young man.

    Amazon Customer says: "So much truth, much of it scary."
    "Haunting Satire"
    Overall

    This work, as is stated within and elsewhere, was the most difficult for Lewis to write because of its grim nature and, as he has hinted, the ease with which he was able to write it. One reviewer wrote that Lewis' ego was "out of control" as he told a "thinly veiled story." I think the listener missed the point of the book. Lewis was writing a satire in an attempt to point out the many ways in which we selfishly assure ourselves of our own right actions - all the while possibly dooming ourselves and hindering others. I find it well thought out, well written, and very witty. I would be surprised if anyone who read/listened to this book did not find themselves analyzing their own lives for the same well meaning, but destructive, attitudes and actions depicted therein.

    20 of 21 people found this review helpful
  • Saint Thomas Aquinas, the Dumb Ox

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By G.K. Chesterton
    • Narrated By Frederick Davidson
    Overall
    (118)
    Performance
    (15)
    Story
    (14)

    Careless about dress and demeanor and other worldly fripperies, St. Thomas was a man who enjoyed banquets, conviviality, jokes and pranks. His inner certitude aboutreligious truth permitted him to accept the world and its freedom and it endowed him with a childlike innocence. In what many consider to be his best work, G.K. Chesterton portrays St. Thomas in a light that few have imagined.

    GLENN says: "Delivers what he promises"
    "Not a Biography. An introduction to Thomism"
    Overall

    This book is slightly difficult to make it through, though I thought it was primarily do to the lilting tone of the narrator, rather than the style of the author. G.K. Chesterton is, of course, a character in his own right; and so the book is filled with pun, alliteration, and many a reference to his peers and the scientific and philosophic views of his time. It seemed to me that there was rather less reference to the views of Aquinas' own time, which were summed up with great skill. As it is, it is as fun a look at G.K. Chesterton's views and philosophy as it is that of Aquinas'. You might call it essential Chesterton, while labeling it Aquinas for the (now no more) Agnostic Naturalist Academic Skeptic WWI Veteran.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Works and Days

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Hesiod, Richmond Lattimore (translator)
    • Narrated By Charlton Griffin
    Overall
    (48)
    Performance
    (21)
    Story
    (22)

    Among the finest poets of ancient Greece was Hesiod, a contemporary of Homer, who lived in the eighth century B.C. It is still a matter of dispute whether Homer or Hesiod was the earlier poet, and sometimes whether they were one and the same person! At any rate, Hesiod's incredible poetry serves as a major source for our understanding of Greek mythology, farming practices, time keeping and astronomy. In and of itself, the "Works and Days" is unparalleled in its richness and beauty, easily rivaling Homer.

    Matthew says: "Excellent"
    "Excellent"
    Overall

    This audiobook is short, but well worth the listen. Charlton Griffin may not be to the liking of all, but I think his clear pronunciation mixed with his occasional (and a bit comical) forays into the dramatic are well done. The Theogony is a great outline-style primer on Greek myth. All around a fun read, or well...listen.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • The Traveler

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By John Twelve Hawks
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2278)
    Performance
    (451)
    Story
    (459)

    Maya is hiding in plain sight in London. The 26-year-old has abandoned the dangerous obligations pressed upon her by her father and chosen instead to live a normal life. But Maya comes from a long line of people who call themselves Harlequins, a fierce group of warriors willing to sacrifice their lives to protect a select few known as Travelers.

    Nicholas Winn says: "Told friends and family"
    "What's that smell?"
    Overall

    Cheese!
    This story is silly and the characters are more like caricatures. It is such drivel and so over-the-top in its attempt to be all-inclusive and all-encompassing that it feels like the low-budget scifi stuff that MST3K likes to poke fun at. As for the "...deep chilling specter of an all-too-possible social and political reality." I think the Publisher's Weekly person who wrote that for the book's publication must not have actually read the book, but instead just listened to the ominous sounding forward by John Twelve Hawks.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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