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Beth

I am a voracious reader with fairly eclectic taste. I like both fiction and non-fiction, biography, history and current events. I like well written mysteries and suspense and I love 19th and 20th century classical literature as well as modern fiction. My favorite author is Philip Roth but I also love Trollope, Hardy, Jonathan Franzen, Jane Austen and Edith Wharton. My favorite biographer is Robert Caro.

Member Since 2001

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  • The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Rebecca Skloot
    • Narrated By Cassandra Campbell, Bahni Turpin
    Overall
    (4226)
    Performance
    (2757)
    Story
    (2786)

    Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells, taken without her knowledge, became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first immortal human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than 60 years.

    Prisca says: "Amazing Story"
    "Really well read, a unique and fascinating story"
    Overall

    This is one of the best audiobooks I have heard in a long time. FIrst of all the readers are so wonderful it transforms the experience into theater. The story is about science and ethics but is even more the story of a family and how it is affected by the discovery that the cells of a mother that died in 1951 go on living today. The cell donor was 29 when she died leaving five children. Her cell line was the first to be kept alive and replicating after her death from cervical cancer in 1951. Apparently her family didn't know anyone had taken a tissue sample. Her children lacked the money to visit the doctor but their dead mother's cells went to the moon and were part of the discovery of a polio vaccine and many other important medical discoveries. It is stunning to see how badly the subjects of medical research were treated such a short time ago. THis book would be an engaging story for people with many divergent interests. Highly recommended."

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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