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John

Marietta, GA, United States | Member Since 2003

5
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 2 reviews
  • 3 ratings
  • 490 titles in library
  • 22 purchased in 2014
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  • The 48 Laws of Power

    • ABRIDGED (9 hrs and 53 mins)
    • By Robert Greene
    • Narrated By Don Leslie
    Overall
    (1367)
    Performance
    (868)
    Story
    (873)

    Amoral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, this piercing work distills 3,000 years of the history of power into 48 well-explicated laws. This bold volume outlines the laws of power in their unvarnished essence, synthesizing the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun-tzu, Carl von Clausewitz, and other great thinkers.

    Ricardo L. says: "Not a how to guide .."
    "Horrible"
    Overall

    Couldn't get past the first few chapters. Horrible narration (over dramatized), and horrible content... "assume everyone else has an agenda, they're out to get you, life is win/lose, do what it takes, whatever you can get away with, and anyone who believes otherwise is naive".

    5 of 10 people found this review helpful
  • Scientific American, April 2011

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 34 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (6)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    "The Inflation Debate": Our best explanation of how the universe evolved must be fixed – or replaced. "The Enemy Within": A new pattern of antibiotic resistance may soon leave us defenseless against a frighteningly wide range of dangerous bacterial infections. "Neuroscience in the Courtroom": Brain scans and other types of neurological evidence could transform judicial views of personal credibility and responsibility.

    Peter says: "Great content but they need a new narrator"
    "Content great, Narrator horrible"
    Overall

    After a several year hiatus from Audible Scientific American, I was dissapointed to find, upon re-subscribing, that the new narrator, Mark Moran, makes the magazine almost unlistenable.

    I think Mark could recover his career by listening to Ken Borgers or Todd Mundt (HBR). Even if he just read the way he converses. I mean, I can't imagine he talks this way to his co-workers or family... it would drive them crazy. Half the time when Mark reaches the end of a sentence, he rolls up in tone, as if he is mid-sentence. It makes it sound as if the entire article is one big run-on sentence. To top it off, he removes any pause between articles. So the entire issue sounds like one big run-on sentence. I can't imagine how this guy got the job. Someone's asleep at the helm.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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