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Cheryl

Seattle, WA, United States | Member Since 2005

ratings
206
REVIEWS
5
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
1
HELPFUL VOTES
79

  • Falling Glass

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Adrian McKinty
    • Narrated By Gerard Doyle
    Overall
    (1269)
    Performance
    (1002)
    Story
    (994)

    Richard Coulter is a man who has everything. His beautiful new wife is pregnant, his upstart airline is undercutting the competition and moving from strength to strength, his diversification into the casino business in Macau has been successful, and his fabulous Art Deco house on an Irish cliff top has just been featured in Architectural Digest. But then, for some reason, his ex-wife Rachel doesn’t keep her side of the custody agreement and vanishes off the face of the earth with Richard’s two daughters. Richard hires Killian, a formidable ex-enforcer for the IRA, to track her down before Rachel, a recovering drug addict, harms herself or the girls.

    Cheryl says: "Hold on to your seat!!!"
    "Hold on to your seat!!!"
    Overall

    Adrian McKinty is a darn good storyteller. He’s the real thing and keeps getting better and better.

    Don’t let this book fool you. Yes, it’s an action-packed thriller, but it’s much more than that. The story is brutal but beautifully, hauntingly, and lyrically written. Imagine a cross pollination of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Chuck Palahniuk. Or James Joyce and Quentin Tarantino. Add laugh out loud passages – the humor is priceless – and little bits and pieces information of all kinds, and you have all the ingredients for a story that’s absolutely impossible to put down.

    “Hidden River” is still my favorite Adrian McKinty novel – your first is often your most memorable – but “Falling Glass” is close (the Dead trilogy is also close… OK, it’s hard to pick a favorite).

    The hero of “Falling Glass” is a good but flawed Irish boy who just wants to recover losses from the bad economy and go back to studying architecture. Killian’s out of “the business” but decides to go back one last time to pull himself out of debt. Thus the ride begins, the roller coaster cranking on the upswing, quickly reaching the crest and before you know it, you’re hanging onto your seat and your hair is standing on end.

    30 of 32 people found this review helpful
  • The Bloomsday Dead

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs)
    • By Adrian McKinty
    • Narrated By Gerard Doyle
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (788)
    Performance
    (329)
    Story
    (319)

    Michael Forsythe is contacted by his former lover, Bridget, a New York Irish Mob boss, whose fiancé he killed. Bridget, calling from Dublin, says that her 11-year-old daughter has been kidnapped. Michael's choice is to fly to Dublin and help her find the girl, or be executed at the hands of Bridget's goons, who are holding him at gunpoint. He agrees to nothing, but is soon on the way to Dublin, leaving the first two of many dead bodies in his wake.

    Johnnie Walker says: "SIX STARS ******"
    "Adrian McKinty sure can write!"
    Overall

    I'm with earlier reviewer Suzan -- McKinty is on my favorite author list. This book races with excitement but I also had to stop and re-read passages because they are so beautifully written. Michael Forsythe, the protagonist, is a force to be reckoned with, but he's also very human and VERY funny. I love this whole series and hope Michael Forsythe returns.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Fifty Grand: A Novel of Suspense

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 59 mins)
    • By Adrian McKinty
    • Narrated By Paula Christensen
    Overall
    (483)
    Performance
    (144)
    Story
    (137)

    An illegal immigrant is killed in a hit-and-run on a frozen mountain road in the town of Fairview, Colorado. No one is prosecuted for his death and his case is quietly forgotten. Six months later another illegal makes a treacherous run across the border, barely escaping with her life. She finds work as a maid and, secretly, begins to investigate the death of her father. But she isn't a maid, and she's not Mexican.

    David says: "Anxiously Awaited"
    "One of the best writers alive"
    Overall

    Great lyrical writing pulled me in immediately and kept me reading. I was very sad when I finished, so I bought the audio version and listened to it, too. If there was another media available, I'd buy that, too. It's that GOOD.

    Frank McCourt wrote this blurb about McKinty:
    "If you're a writer embarking on a new work beware of reading anything by Adrian McKinty. His prose is so hard, so tough, so New York honest you'll find yourself taking a knife to your work. He is a cross between Mickey Spillane and Damon Runyon - the toughest, the best."

    I agree.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • Nothing to Lose: A Jack Reacher Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Lee Child
    • Narrated By Dick Hill
    Overall
    (1486)
    Performance
    (929)
    Story
    (918)

    Two lonely towns in Colorado: Hope and Despair. Between them, 12 miles of empty road. Jack Reacher never turns back. It's not in his nature. All he wants is a cup of coffee. What he gets is big trouble. So in Lee Child's electrifying new novel, Reacher - a man with no fear, no illusions, and nothing to lose - goes to war against a town that not only wants him gone, it wants him dead.

    Ed says: "Least favorite of all the Reacher novels"
    "Get off your soap box, Lee Child"
    Overall

    Definitely the worst Jack Reacher saga and possibly the worst book ever. Its cardboard characters CRAWLED to the finishing line. First time that I've ever set the audible speed on my iPod to "Fast" (only because I'm one of those people who can't NOT finish a book, no matter how bad). And absolutely the most convoluted plot ever.

    Once authors develop a following, why do some of them feel the need to start using their books as soap boxes? Get off your soap box, Lee Child, and go back to what you're great at doing: telling edge-of-your-seat stories through Jack "Dirty Harry" Reacher. PLEASE, turn off your inner Michael Moore. It just doesn't jive with Jack Reacher.

    35 of 43 people found this review helpful
  • Nineteen Minutes

    • UNABRIDGED (21 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Jodi Picoult
    • Narrated By Carol Monda
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2197)
    Performance
    (821)
    Story
    (835)

    Jodi Picoult delivers the riveting tale of one small town's entanglement with high-school violence.

    New York Superior Court Judge Alex Cormier is assigned to preside over the case of the alleged Sterling High School shooter. Lawyer Jordan McAffee represents Peter, the boy who, on the day of the shooting, was found in the corner of the gymnasium holding a gun to his head with a shaky hand. Detective Patrick DuCharme has one star witness, but her story keeps changing. And then there's the biggest problem of all: the star witness happens to be Judge Cormier's daughter.

    Suze says: "Mesmerizing"
    "Pedantic and preachy"
    Overall

    I listened to this book after "My Sister's Keeper" hoping for some of the same fresh writing but was quite disappointed. Perhaps Picoult should move to social essays instead of preaching to us through her fiction. The characters in "Nineteen Minutes" bang us over the head over and over again (which by the way, is quite a feat given they're made of cardboard). Every action, thought, and dialog demonstrate and support a notion that nobody should be held accountable for their actions. Instead, society is the big, bad wolf responsible for every bad thing that happens and no individual should ever really be held responsible for bad mothering, neglect, awful behavior, or even murder. Bad behavior and actions are programmed into you by a rotten society but it's unclear where good actions and behavior come from -- that part seems to be the "mystery" of the book. Rationalizations for lousy, neglectful mothering got tiring after the first 20 pages and didn't let up until the very end.

    I hope Picoult's pedantic phase is out of the way now and she'll get off her soap box and back to good character-driven fiction.

    6 of 8 people found this review helpful

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