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Robin

Robin Maxwell

Pioneertown,, CA, United States | Member Since 2011

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  • 200 titles in library
  • 24 purchased in 2014
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  • The Secret History of the World: As Laid Down by the Secret Societies

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By Mark Booth
    • Narrated By John Lee
    Overall
    (94)
    Performance
    (54)
    Story
    (53)

    In this groundbreaking new work, Mark Booth embarks on an enthralling intellectual tour of our world's secret histories. Starting from a dangerous premise - that everything we've been taught about our world's past is corrupted, and that the stories put forward by the various cults and mystery schools throughout history are true - Booth produces nothing short of an alternate history of the past 3,000 years.

    Robin says: "A unique perspective"
    "A unique perspective"
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    As as an author and student of esoteric history myself, I wasn't really expecting to learn anything new from this book, but I was happily surprised. What Mark Booth accomplished so deftly was the the tying together of the long and divergent aspects of the secret history of the world into a single, coherent story about the evolution of consciousness. And his observations about the importance of certain historical figures were sometimes quite stunning. I'm a non-believer, and while I've always thought of Jesus as a charismatic man, great teacher, and someone crucial to the history of civilization, Booth's assertion that he was pivotal in the evolution of human psychology -- being the first person to espouse the virtue of an individual loving one's fellow man -- hit me like a brick. Likewise, I've always been peeved at Freud for his male-centric theories, but Mark Booth points out that Freud introduced the world to the notion of the subconscious. Suddenly these two figures (as well as several others) assumed their rightful positions in the evolution of human thought. This book is jam-packed with facts and is sometimes a bit dense, but it's never dull. I suggest if you start feeling bogged down, skip ahead a little. You'll surely find yourself immersed in something fascinating in the next chapter. The reader, John Lee, has a very cultured British accent. I liked it very much.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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