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Judith A. Weller

jw1917

LaVale, MD United States | Member Since 2008

260
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 80 reviews
  • 116 ratings
  • 380 titles in library
  • 12 purchased in 2014
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45

  • Augustus: The Life of Rome's First Emperor

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Anthony Everitt
    • Narrated By John Curless
    Overall
    (753)
    Performance
    (350)
    Story
    (351)

    Caesar Augustus has been called history's greatest emperor. It was said he found Rome made of clay and left it made of marble. With a senator for a father and Julius Caesar for a great-uncle, he ascended the ranks of Roman society with breathtaking speed. His courage in battle is still questioned yet his political savvy was second to none. He had a lifelong rival in Mark Antony and a 51-year companion in his wife, Livia. And his influence extended perhaps further than that of any ruler who has ever lived.

    John says: "Outstanding!"
    "Great Book about Rome's Greatest Empire."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a great book about the man who created the Roman Empire. Granted there are a few fictitious parts dealing with Augustus's death that I did not care for. Also he is more lenient on Livia's the wife of Augustus than I would have been. I have always found her a detestable and manipulative woman

    For me this book was at its best when it deals with the young Augustus and his formative years. In his youth it would be hard to imagine that this sickly boy with no military skills would nevertheless triumph over far better known opponents like Mark Anthony and eventually be the last man standing after the civil wars are over. It makes one wonder what latent talents Julius Caesar must have seen in the the young Octavian to make him his heir -- and a worthy heir he turned out to be.

    Augustus had an iron fist in a velvet glove. He got his way without ever seeming to dominate the various political entities in Rome. He was a skilled politician who knew his own limitations and thus surrounded himself with the most able people for the job who would complement and supplement his own talents.

    In Marcus Agrippa he found a brilliant military leader who more than anyone defeated Antony and Cleopatra at Actium while Octavian lay sick in his tent. It was Agrippa who created. built, and trained the fleet which would win Actium. Also Agrippa was responsible for an enormous rebuilding of Rome and constructed the Pantheon and the Baths of Agrippa.

    However, like all those able men who surrounded Augustus, they never attempted to outshine him, but rather let him take the credit. In their own way they were as skillful at politics as Augustus himself.

    Everitt thoroughly explortes not only the personality and political skill of Augusted himself, but he also gives us great portraits of the able men he surrounded himself with -- Agrippa, Maecenas etc. This is a well-rounded book since it focuses on all aspects of Augustus' rule and the heartbreaking inability of the great man to have a worthy successor.

    This is probably the best book ever written on the man, but also on the birth of Imperial Rome,

    The narrator is outstanding and gives the right nuance to the author's word. If you are atll interested in this period of Roman History this book should not be missed.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Hardcastle's Airmen: Hardcastle Series

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Graham Ison
    • Narrated By David Thorpe
    Overall
    (3)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    In February 1915, the Great War is still raging on the Western Front, but in Westminster, at the centre of Hardcastle's bailiwick, a policeman is shot dead. At first, Hardcastle believes the murderer to have been a disturbed burglar. But as enquiries continue, attention focuses on an antiquarian bookseller, a struggling artist, a reporter, officers of the Royal Flying Corps, both in England and in France, and the activities of Isabel Plowman, the wife of one of them and the lover of others.

    Judith A. Weller says: "Most Entertaining and Funny Mystery Series"
    "Most Entertaining and Funny Mystery Series"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a great series. It has good story, well plotted mystery and on top of that it is very humorous. The reader, Graham Thorpe, adds so much to the book. He does the voices so well and gives each one its own character.

    Of course the star is Detective Inspector Hardcastle who bring so much wit to the series as he deals with his subordinates and intimidates all around him, especially the person he is interviewing. He never lets their title or position stand in his way.

    In this book Hardcastle is dealing with the murder of one of his constables. As he intestigates it turnes out the constable was NOT the target, but rather the lady next door. This lady claims to be a widow but as the body count continues, it turns out she is not a widow, but more of a "good time girl" who loves men in uniform. Unravelling this mystery takes Hardcastle to the corridors of power. A great book. All too short! I can't stop listening to one once I start.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Hunting Shadows: An Inspector Ian Rutledge Mystery, Book 16

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Charles Todd
    • Narrated By Simon Prebble
    Overall
    (112)
    Performance
    (99)
    Story
    (97)

    A society wedding at Ely Cathedral in Cambridgeshire becomes a crime scene when a man is murdered. After another body is found, the baffled local constabulary turns to Scotland Yard. Though the second crime had a witness, her description of the killer is so strange it's unbelievable. Despite his experience, Inspector Ian Rutledge has few answers of his own. The victims are so different that there is no rhyme or reason to their deaths. Nothing logically seems to connect them - except the killer. As the investigation widens, a clear suspect emerges. But for Rutledge, the facts still don't add up, leaving him to question his own judgment.

    Linda Lou McCall says: "ANOTHER SOLID HIT FROM CHARLES TODD!!!"
    "Fantastic - Keeps You Guessing Till the very End"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is an outstanding book. I have read or listened to all of Charles Todd's books and I found this one the best plotted of all. It kept me guessing right to the end. Even when I though I knew who the murderer was, Todd pulled one out of the hat with a big surprise at the end when you found out who the murderer was.

    One thing I did notice was that Hamish was not such a big presence as he has been in the earlier book - whether Inspector Rutledge is getting over the events or Hamish didn't really fit in - but in any case he wasn't as ubiquitous as in the earlier books. In a way I am rather glad to see less of Hamish.

    As in all his books you get to see another part of England – this time the Fen country, as it was in 1920, and the small villages there. In post World War I getting around in the Fens was dangerous. Dense fogs would roll in, the roads were not well marked and often little better than dirt road. Inspector Rutledge begins his investigation by getting lost and almost having a motor accident.

    As always Charles Todd paints a picture of 1920 England: with farms, small villages, market day and places where everyone knows everyone else. He has the gift to take the listener back in time to a long-ago England.

    What brings Rutledge to the Fen Country is two murders a week apart of two very important figures -- one a distinguished War veteran, and the other a local man standing for parliament. One is killed at Ely Cathedral, the other nearby while preparing to give a campaign speech. They seem unrelated but it is only at the end we see how they are tied together.

    Much of the books is spend in actual detecting -- Rutledge going to different places and talking to many people to try and find out what connects the two murders. The only clue he picks up early on it that the murders were committed by an excellent shot, most probably a sniper. Many people are interviewed by Rutledge and local constables but nothing seems to fit. The roots of the crime go back to before the war and it is only when Rutledge gets as off-hand request from a local doctor, the he finally gets on track.

    He only finally fits the pieces together when he travels back to London to interview the sister of one of the victims -- between London and Ely and trip to Mausoleum do all the pieces finally fit into place. This book keeps you guessing up to the very end.

    Having Simon Prebble read this book, makes it all that much better. Simon is one of the most outstanding narrators in the business and I know I will enjoy the book that much more when he is the narrator. He is the perfect narrator for the series!!

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Mayhem

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Sarah Pinborough
    • Narrated By Steven Crossley
    Overall
    (8)
    Performance
    (7)
    Story
    (7)

    A new killer is stalking the streets of London’s East End. Though newspapers have dubbed him 'the Torso Killer’, this murderer’s work is overshadowed by the hysteria surrounding Jack the Ripper’s Whitechapel crimes. The victims are women too, but their dismembered bodies, wrapped in rags and tied up with string, are pulled out of the Thames - and the heads are missing….

    Sylvia says: "Just Wow."
    "A Supernatural Mystery"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    If you like stories about the supernatural you will love this book, if you think you are getting a mystery story set in 19th Century with Jack the Ripper thrown in - you will be very disappointed. The book focuses on another set of real murders of the same period: The Thames Torso Murders, also called the Embankment murders. These murders, however, were overshadowed by Jack the Ripper and have never really entered into stories about the period as Jack the Ripper did, like those of Jack the Ripper they were never solved.

    The Author uses real people from the period, chiefly Dr. Thomas Bond, who was the police surgeon at the time. He is the main character in the book. While Dr. Bond does give some description of the Ripper Murders and the Ripper victims, his real focus is on the Torso Murders.

    The Torso murders took place between 1887-1889. Torsos of young women were washing up along the Thames embankment. The bodies were headless and their limbs were hacked off. The limbs were found separately packaged, also washing up along the Thames. These murders were never solved, and since the heads were missing, the victims were never identified.

    This sounds like the start of a really good book - but alas it is not, at least for me. Yes it is very atmospheric in describing the London of the period. But I am not a fan of the supernatural and the author attributes the Torso murders to a man who has been "taken over" by a supernatural being. So a lot of the book is consumed not with the mystery, but of finding the individual who was taken over by this supernatural being and when did it happen.

    The writing style does not lend itself to a smooth, flowing story. The author uses several different characters to tell the story, although Thomas Bond is the main figure. The chapters in the book alternate between the point of view of different characters -- some written in the first person, other in the third person, and chapters which are newspapers accounts of the crimes. Also the book does not flow chronologically - but tends to skip around between 1887 and 1889, depending on the POV of the character in the chapter. The listener will need to pay close attention to the chapter titles in order to follow this book, as the date is always given as part of the chapter heading.

    The Narration is excellent and helps carry the reader along through the story. However, the narrator cannot overcome the long periods of boredom as we explore a character’s thoughts and internal musings. Again if you like supernatural/fantasy mysteries you will love this book. I did not.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Istanbul Passage: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Joseph Kanon
    • Narrated By Jefferson Mays
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (217)
    Performance
    (163)
    Story
    (165)

    A neutral capital straddling Europe and Asia, Istanbul has spent the war as a magnet for refugees and spies. Even American businessman Leon Bauer has been drawn into this shadow world, doing undercover odd jobs and courier runs for the Allied war effort. Now, as the espionage community begins to pack up and an apprehensive city prepares for the grim realities of postwar life, he is given one more assignment, a routine job that goes fatally wrong, plunging him into a tangle of intrigue and moral confusion.

    Maine Colonial says: "What choice do you make when all options are bad?"
    "Boring and Tedious"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This has to be one of the most boring and tedious espionage books I have listened to. Only the narrator saves it. The plot sounds fairly exciting. The main character, Leon, acts as a part time courier for am official, Tommy, at the British Embassy. The opening scene is exciting. Leon is at the docks awaiting a boat which is brining a Romanian defector with USSR/KGB secrets for the Americans. Gun fire erupts and Leon kills his assailant only to discover that he has killed the Brit from whom he has worked as an occasional courier. Obviously Tommy was a double agent.

    The balance of the books deals with Leon trying to discover who Tommy really worked for, and trying to see that the Romanian is delivered to the American. Unfortunately this exciting sounding plot is revealed not by action, but by long and often boring conversation with a large number of people Leon meets at parties, at the Embassy, etc.

    Combined with this story are the flashbacks about Leon’s life and marriage in pre-war Berlin to Anna, who as the result of traumatic accident now lies in a coma in a nursing home. Leon faithfully goes to see here and hold long conversations with here about what he is doing and what his plans are.

    For a little spice, he has an affair with Kay Bishop, an embassy wife, whose husband is murdered. Suspicion falls on Leon. Again most of this is revealed through long conversation. I skipped a lot of the part about his relationship with Kay – he spent one night with here in a hotel room and the conversations they had goes on for several hours on the audio book. I skipped it. There is just too much tedious conversation like that to make the book an entertaining read.

    Although it has an exciting plot on paper, the author’s method of development may have a limited appeal. The author know Turkey and Istanbul very well, but even when he goes to a location we get a description of the location not in a word picture, bur rather with a long drawn-out conversation or worse monologues with flash backs about going to the location with Anna.

    If you can tolerate a book whose plot development is done mostly with long conversations with a variety of characters and very little action, you may like this book.. But the author is no Eric Ambler or Alan Furst.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Rubicon: A Novel of Ancient Rome

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Steven Saylor
    • Narrated By Ralph Cosham
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (6)
    Performance
    (5)
    Story
    (5)

    As Caesar marches on Rome and panic erupts in the city, Gordianus the Finder discovers, in his own home, the body of Pompey’s favorite cousin. Before fleeing the city, Pompey exacts a terrible bargain from the finder of secrets: to unearth the killer or sacrifice his own son-in-law to service in Pompey’s legions - and certain death. Amid the city’s sordid underbelly, Gordianus learns that the murdered man was a dangerous spy. Now, as he follows a trail of intrigue, betrayal, and ferocious battles on land and sea, the Finder is caught between the chaos of war and the terrible truth he must finally reveal.

    Judith A. Weller says: "Not At His Best"
    "Not At His Best"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is probably the worst Gordianus mystery I have read. It takes place during the civil war between Pompey and Caesar and deals with the flight of Pompey from Brundisium.
    I found it quite boring in places. First of all this is not really a mystery. The murder which starts the book is immediately solvable and thus the murder is unimportant. The real mystery, which we don't learn much about until the end of the book, is whether Meto is in a plot to assassinate Caesar.

    What consumes the bulk of the book is the tale of Gordianus traveling to Brundisium and getting inside Pompey’s camp. Along the way he has Tiro, Cicero's Scribe, as a travelling companion and he stops at Cicero's villa to talk to him. There is the obligatory attack on the Appian Way by bandits and the capture of the travelers by Mark Antony.

    Gordianus is most concerned of finding his son Meto in Caesar's camp but he gets no chance to talk to him. He must get to Pompey's camp to save his son-in-law Davus, and then escape from Pompey's clutches and return to Rome. Pompey’s escape from Brundisium is probably the most interesting part of the whole book.

    Personally I have always been lukewarm about Gordianus as a detective. I always thought the best book was "Murder on the Appian Way". Gordianus is a little too much of a goody two shoes to fit into the Roman world. He pales by comparison with Caecilius Metellus in SPQR. However, if you like Gordianus you will probably like this book.

    The narrator is not too bad but certainly better than Scott Brick in the earlier books. However, he is not in the class win Simon Vance or other notable narrators.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Dollmaker: A St-Cyr and Kohler Mystery, Book 6

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By J. Robert Janes
    • Narrated By Jean Brassard
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    January 1943. The naval war in the North Atlantic is at its deadliest as a diminished Luftwaffe cannot defend the Brittany coast and its submarine stations from RAF bombers. Still, St-Cyr and Kohler continue to fight "common crime" under the Occupation. A Breton shopkeeper has been murdered. The accused, a U-boat Kapitn, is a protégé of Admiral Doenitz and heir to a doll manufactory. Unwilling players in a tragedy driven by greed and revenge, St-Cyr and Kohler must also contend with a fiercely loyal submarine crew....

    Judith A. Weller says: "Another Good Mystery Set in Wartime France"
    "Another Good Mystery Set in Wartime France"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I have reviewed many in this series and I personally like the whole series. To me this is another fascinating mystery set in wartime France.

    Our pair detectives have been sent by Admiral Doenitz to prove that a popular Submarine Captain is NOT guilty of murder of French merchant.

    The Captain has a bizarre hobby - he makes dolls. And he goes on hikes into the countryside to find the right clay for the heads. A broken doll found at the murder scene implicates the captain although he insists that the clay was too cheap for one of his dolls.

    Also he and crew have invested a lot of money in the Captain's doll making enterprise. But someone has stolen the money.

    Soon our detectives get involved with émigré Pianist turned archaeologist, and his family who have a large doll collection.

    In fact dolls are everywhere in this story and it is discovering the story behind the different kind of dolls that solves the mystery and eventually leads to the murderer and thief of the money.

    As always the narrator is excellent although some may find his French accent hard to understand. After a little of listening you will find that it adds a lot to the narration.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Midnight Man

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By Paul Doherty
    • Narrated By Andrew Wincott
    Overall
    (3)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    When Brother Anselm and his novice are summoned to the Church of St Michael’s in Candlewick to perform an exorcism, little are they prepared for the horror that waits. The demons and apparitions that plague the church would appear to have been summoned by an infamous sorcerer known as the Midnight Man. But what has he unwittingly unleashed - and why? Is someone using the haunting as the perfect cover for their murderous intent? And is there any link with the sudden disappearances of a number of young women in the area? The answers lie in the past and an unresolved wickedness from many decades before.

    Judith A. Weller says: "Canterbury Tales as Horror Stories"
    "Canterbury Tales as Horror Stories"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Paul Doherty has taken Chaucer's Canterbury tales and retold them as horror stories. It is an interesting concept and if you like horror stories with a Medieval Twist you will enjoy these. Like all of Doherty's books this one is based on facts -- for this tale it is John Puddlicott's great robbery of the English Crown Jewel in 1303. The monks of Westminister Abbey were seduced into aiding Pudlicott.

    Since this has been turned into a horror story we find Brother Anslem exorcising Demons and solving the murders of whores -- many over the years has disappeared in the night to satisfy satanic rituals and blood drinkers.

    If you like horror stories you will enjoy this and Andress Wincott is an outstanding narrator.

    Now you are probably asking why I rated the story so low. Well I frankly have never liked Doherty's version of the Canterbury tales. Although I like this author very much, this series does not appeal to me, although many readers love it and find it his best work. I guess I am not into horror stories. But if you like horror stories you will enjoy this book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • SPQR VIII: The River God's Vengeance

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 19 mins)
    • By John Maddox Roberts
    • Narrated By John Lee
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (26)
    Performance
    (23)
    Story
    (23)

    Ancient Rome, in this accurate and evocative series, is just as politics driven as any major American city - possibly even more. Decius Caecilius Metellus has, through a series of rather wild adventure, and in the act of tracking down killers and other reprobates, barely escaped annhilation several times. Now, newly elected to the office of aedile, the lowest rung on the ladder of Roman authority, he must smoke out corruption and conspiracy that threaten to destroy all of Rome.

    Judith A. Weller says: "Sewers and Theaters and Father Tiber"
    "Sewers and Theaters and Father Tiber"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is another hilarious mystery for Decius. Now he an aedile who is responsible for the upkeep of the drains, the Cloaca Maxima, and the building code. Like all aedile he is expected to stage games for the public -- and these cannot be done on the cheap. You need gladiators, wild beasts, plays and mimes.

    It starts off with the collapse of an Insula (tenement) in which our aedile discovers violations of the building code when he inspects the collapse. Also it also seems that some killed in the collapse were actually murdered. While trying to sort out the murder, Decius is also busy preparing for his "games" -- and he goes to see a rehearsal of a play to be staged at the games. The theater seems a little wobbly and might collapse.

    To add to this it is a season of heavy rain and the drains, which have not been cleaned out in years, overflow flooding the city. The wobbly theater collapses as Decius and his sidekick Hermes have a narrow escape during the collapse which by chance also kills the murderer.

    The book is great fun and should not be missed. I am so glad Audible is bringing this series to audio books. John Lee is an excellent narrator

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Carousel

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By J. Robert Janes
    • Narrated By Jean Brassard
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    A kept woman’s murder leads detectives St-Cyr and Kohler to the upper crust of occupied Paris. It is December 1942, and the Parisian Gestapo agents pass their days by executing dissidents and plotting the destruction of the Resistance. Homicide detectives Jean-Louis St-Cyr and Hermann Kohler, meanwhile, must make do solving the gritty crimes with which the Nazi elite do not bother. Just hours after they learn that St-Cyr’s wife and child have died, the partners confront an ugly murder that turns out to be very glamorous indeed.

    Judith A. Weller says: "Black Marketeers in Occupied France"
    "Black Marketeers in Occupied France"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I really love this series and this book was another good one. I think the narrator with his French accent adds so much to the series.

    This is really about the Black Market in France during WW II. It starts out very simply with a man found murdered on a Carousel and a woman murdered in an apartment. At first there seems little to connect the two crimes but as the investigation moves forward we find out that the two are very much connected.

    The plot takes amazing twist and turns as more characters get added to the story. There is no doubt that this is more complex in plot development than most standard mysteries. There are a whole host of characters each of whom plays a different but vital roll in the plot. But the murders are all related to a black market ring operating out of Paris and it is all tied up in a neat package at the end when everyone gathers at the Carousel for exposing of the murderer.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Semper Fidelis: A Novel of the Roman Empire

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Ruth Downie
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (196)
    Performance
    (176)
    Story
    (173)

    As mysterious injuries, and even deaths, begin to appear in the medical ledgers, it's clear that all is not well amongst the native recruits to Britannia's imperial army. Is the much-decorated centurion Geminus preying on his weaker soldiers? And could this be related to the appearance of Emperor Hadrian? Bound by his sense of duty and ill-advised curiosity, Ruso begins to ask questions nobody wants to hear. Meanwhile his barbarian wife Tilla is finding out some of the answers....

    Margaret says: "Hadrian is here!"
    "Not as Good as Earlier Books in this Series"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I have read all the books in the series and this is definately not one of the best. I found it dragging in spots. I have really come to dislike Tilla. The story centers about the Centurion Geminus and the death of many native recruits to the 20th Legion.

    I think the problem for me in this series is that Tilla is becoming more, and more implausible as a character. I just find her activities in assisting Russo in the murder investigations not really true to the times. Yes Roman soldiers did occasionally marry a "native" woman during their time in Britain but this woman would never have been allowed the freedom to wander around the Fort and snoop the way the Tilla does. Actually at times I find Tilla quite annoying.

    The mystery of the deaths of the young recruits is quite a good one, and I suspect not an unusual occurrence. But the laxity of some of the commanders I found difficult to believe. The Roman Legion, even in Britain, was still a pretty well-organized and disciplined machine. But one never sees this in the book. Instead we are given a picture of sloppy, slovenly bunch of recruits and commanders.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful

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