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Alan

United States | Member Since 2012

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  • 2 reviews
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  • 1 titles in library
  • 5 purchased in 2014
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  • Dixie City Jam: A Dave Roubicheaux Novel, Book 7

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 46 mins)
    • By James Lee Burke
    • Narrated By Mark Hammer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (87)
    Performance
    (76)
    Story
    (74)

    They're out there, under the salt - the bodies of German seamen who used to lie in wait at the mouth of the Mississippi for unescorted American tankers sailing from the oil refineries of Baton Rouge out into the Gulf of Mexico. As a child, Dave Robicheaux had been haunted by the sailors' images. Years later, Robicheaux, a detective with the New Iberia sheriff's office, finds himself and his family at serious risk, stalked for his knowledge of a watery burial ground by a mysterious man named Will Buchalter - a man who believes that the Holocaust was one big hoax.

    Dennis says: "Jury out on this one"
    "Dixie City Jam"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    If you could sum up Dixie City Jam in three words, what would they be?

    Robicheaux finds WWII Sub


    What did you like best about this story?

    Burke has a fearless mastery of language and dialogue. He is almost Poe like in his use of vocabulary and tempo but he isn't beyond using terms that have been all but outlawed in today's politically correct society. But Mark Hammer is the reason for the success of the audible series. His Cajun vernacular is spot on and melodic. His narrations are almost musical.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    When Dave Robicheaus's ex-partner demolishes a criminal's mansion and his reason for doing it is beyond genius. I don't want to spoil it but Ceitus is so colorful and contrasting side of the coin of Dave's personality, it is almost like they are one person.


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

    Racism rises from the depths.


    Any additional comments?

    I would like to see serialized books listed in the order they were published.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Purple Cane Road: A Dave Robicheaux Novel, Book 11

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By James Lee Burke
    • Narrated By Nick Sullivan
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (82)
    Performance
    (72)
    Story
    (74)

    Dave Robicheaux has spent his life confronting the age-old adage that the sins of the father pass on to the son. But what was his mother's legacy? Dead to him since his youth, Mae Guillory has been shuttered away in the deep recesses of Robicheaux's mind. While helping out an old friend, Dave is stunned when a pimp looks at him sideways and asks if he is the son of Mae Guillory, the whore a bunch of cops murdered 30 years ago. Her body was dumped in the bayou bordering Purple Cane Road, and the cops who left her there are still on the job.

    Dixie says: "Great Story - WRONG Narrator"
    "Accent or dialect? Both apply in New Orleans."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you listen to Purple Cane Road again? Why?

    I love New Orleans though I never spent much time there. It is the culture and language that set it apart from almost anywhere else in the world. So the narration is important to the story. Nick Sullivan is a good narrator but his interpretation of the French-Cajun dialect does determent to the story.

    People of Louisianan are a mixture of almost all Caribbean cultures but the narrator uses a distinctively Jamaican accent to interpret the French creole. Burke is a great student of language in his stories. In many of his books, he can determine a person’s origin by listening to the dialect. So we as his readers and listeners know how important this is to him and the story line.

    It is akin to substituting Maurice Chevalier with Jar Jar Binks and hoping no one notices.


    What did you like best about this story?

    As always Burke has a point of view or observation that is completely fresh, naked, and free from self delusion. He is like Hemingway. He writes about the things he knows and dares anyone to deny its truth.


    What didn’t you like about Nick Sullivan’s performance?

    Nick Sullivan is a good narrator but his interpretation of the French-Cajun dialect does determent to the story.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    It is with extreme effort that Burke centers Dave Robicheaux’s character on his concepts of good versus evil. We understand him best through his weaknesses. When he is wrong, he is driven to drink and not until he makes amends does his ability to resist his greater temptations find victory. Except for the perfect among us, this is a path of contrition we all could use in our daily lives.


    Any additional comments?

    I once thought I could write until I read James Lee Burke. It is a shame his work has not garnered more serious attention just because he is a mystery writer.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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