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Ray Massey

ratings
44
REVIEWS
3
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
0
HELPFUL VOTES
3

  • Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat: Why It's So Hard to Think Straight About Animals

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 54 mins)
    • By Hal Herzog
    • Narrated By Mel Foster
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (130)
    Performance
    (90)
    Story
    (92)

    Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat is a highly entertaining and illuminating journey through the full spectrum of human-animal relations, based on Herzog's groundbreaking research on animal rights activists, cockfighters, professional dog show handlers, veterinary students, and biomedical researchers. Blending anthropology, history, brain science, behavioral economics, evolutionary psychology, and philosophy, Herzog carefully crafts a seamless narrative.

    Fara says: "Thorough and beautifully written"
    "Good but came short"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Yes. Contains interesting stories and information on how we interact with animals. The author recognizes that we are inconsistent in the way we deal with animals. I expected the book to be lean towards animal rights but found the author to really wrestle with the implications of granting animals equal status with humans.

    He struggles with the question of whether humans and animals are different in kind or different in degree. If different in degree, rather than kind, this argues for treating animals as we would treat humans. He recognizes this as overly difficult and therefore settles for being inconsistent. He will treat humans better than animals (eat them, use them for experimentation and work, etc). But he gave up too easily on the question of difference. I suggest reading Part 1 of "The Everlasting Man" by G. K. Chesterton for a great treatise on man being different in kind from animals. If you settle on this, much of the anguish the author struggles with would be more consistently resolved. Great stories but he gave up too easily on the foundational truth that would resolve the dilemma.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Man of the Family: Little Britches #2

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 33 mins)
    • By Ralph Moody
    • Narrated By Cameron Beierle
    Overall
    (78)
    Performance
    (53)
    Story
    (55)

    At age 11, Ralph becomes man of the family and an entrepreneur. He continues his horse riding and cattle driving, and the Moody's start a cooking business.

    Sam says: "Quality family time"
    "Great Life Lessons"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What made the experience of listening to Man of the Family the most enjoyable?

    I like all Ralph Moody books I have read. This one I decided to listen to as well. I was not disappointed. The story came through with the same strength and heart.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Irrational Economist: Making Decisions in a Dangerous World

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Erwann Michel-Kerjan, Paul Slovic
    • Narrated By Bill Quinn
    Overall
    (11)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (4)

    Of the 20 most costly catastrophes since 1970, more than half have occurred since 2001. Is this an omen of what the 21st century will be? How might we behave in this new, uncertain and more dangerous environment? Will our actions be rational or irrational?

    Roman says: "Collection of articles, rather than a book."
    "Academic Hubris"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What would have made The Irrational Economist better?

    The book should have had "uncertainty" or "risk management" in the title. It assumed that decision makers were irrational because they addressed uncertainty differently than the authors would have addressed it. While the made mention of decision theory and the importance of psychology in making decisions, they assumed that their methods were superior. The title or summary should also have emphasized that a major portion of the book dealt with climate change. The authors had a perspective and treated other perspectives as neanderthal.


    You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

    It actually contains excellent information on decision making theory and uncertainty.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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