You no longer follow Doug D. Eigsti

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Doug D. Eigsti

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Doug D. Eigsti

Increasing my ops tempo by allowing storytellers to whisper in my ear(buds).

Colorado Springs, Colorado United States | Member Since 2013

134
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 143 reviews
  • 153 ratings
  • 619 titles in library
  • 5 purchased in 2015
FOLLOWING
37
FOLLOWERS
9

  • The Third Reich in Power

    • UNABRIDGED (31 hrs and 57 mins)
    • By Richard J. Evans
    • Narrated By Sean Pratt
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (387)
    Performance
    (245)
    Story
    (245)

    The definitive account of Germany's malign transformation under Hitler's total rule and the implacable march to war. This magnificent second volume of Richard J. Evans's three-volume history of Nazi Germany was hailed by Benjamin Schwartz of The Atlantic Monthly as "the definitive English-language account... gripping and precise." It chronicles the incredible story of Germany's radical reshaping under Nazi rule.

    Mike From Mesa says: "A catalog of horrors"
    "Peace Through Joy"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Peace Through Joy and Other Nazi Propaganda Schemes Exposed

    I am grateful to Richard J. Evans for this history. His matter of fact narrative somehow makes this subject come alive. One of the most intriguing aspects of Nazi Germany was how they managed to quell the resistance of the German people. They did it by ruthless totalitarian intimidation. It is a study in human depravity and weakness to stand against injustice. Be careful when reading this for you will begin to see Nazis everywhere when you realize that our government is resorting to many of the same propaganda measures the Nazis used. Hitler artificially reported the unemployment numbers by removing the jobs lost from the reporting; our government foes the same thing. And then there is Hitler’s fanatical hatred of the Jews. Here Evans does the best job at explaining this that I have read. Antisemitism had long been a part of European culture, but it was not officially sanctioned. When Hitler institutionalized and authorized hatred of Jewish people he allowed this evil to have free reign and it quickly became a widespread no holds barred cultural obsession not just a series of disjointed acts of closet racial prejudice. It is shameful to realize that members of the human race can actively act in this genocidal manner. It is also shameful to see the Western leaders fail time and time again to act when at many points they could have stopped this reign of terror from ever being launched.

    This is one of the most fascinating periods of human history: one, because it did not happen so very long ago that we cannot relate to the world situation; two, because the characters on opposing sides, such as Hitler and Goering, Stalin and Churchill, are so dominant in their own spheres if influence to seem super human caricatures or comic book villains and heroes; and three, because WWII altered the world in which we live so profoundly that we must delve into the causes of this upheaval. I have read and listened to many volumes of lore on the Second World War and find that I still learn something new in every section of this book by Evans. I have recently listened to THE STORM OF WAR by Andrew Roberts, THE RISE AND FALL OF THE THIRD REICH by William L. Shirer. This book covers the topic from an entirely different, and more insightful, angle.

    Sean Pratt again does a great job at reading giving clear pronunciation throughout. His voice is pleasant and never becomes a distraction.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Lines of Departure

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 7 mins)
    • By Marko Kloos
    • Narrated By Luke Daniels
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (760)
    Performance
    (707)
    Story
    (706)

    Vicious interstellar conflict with an indestructible alien species. Bloody civil war over the last habitable zones of the cosmos. Political unrest, militaristic police forces, dire threats to the solar system.

    Elle in the Great NorthWest says: "MUCH BETTER than the first book"
    "…..Top Notch Performance by Luke Daniels....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Things are looking increasingly bleak for mankind and Andrew Grayson in this sequel to TERMS OF ENLISTMENT. Marcos Kloos is attempting to give us a space opera with a sense of authenticity—no mean feat for a work of Science Fiction set largely in outer space. As a result this book series has a lot of military attention to detail. It also has a lot of military personnel. Their gung-ho lingo and gruff matter-of-fact banter are the highlights of this series. This book is every bit as good as the first, and is a fine example of a tightly plotted story. I will leave you to discover the story for yourselves.

    Luke Daniels gives a top level performance. He places a tremendous amount of emotion into his performance. I greatly enjoyed his effort in bringing every dialog scene to life. This is a kind of one man show where the actor plays all the parts. The amazing thing is that oftentimes it seems like a cast of voice actors are on stage—but no—Luke Daniels does them all himself. His portrayal of the female characters is particularly good to my ear. Somehow he manages to mimic the female vocal cords with a superb sense of pacing and inflection and manages to avoid the all too common sense I get from some other narrators of a two-hundred pound man in drag imitating a woman’s voice in falsetto. When this book came out I went back and listened to the first book again not only to refresh my memory of the story but to relive Luke Daniels’ performance. If all narrators were as competent as Daniels we would have a an explosion of new audiobook listeners who, after listening to just their first audiobook, would be instantly convinced of the beauty of the medium.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Tech World: Undying Mercenaries, Book 3

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 43 mins)
    • By B.V. Larson
    • Narrated By Mark Boyett
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (822)
    Performance
    (768)
    Story
    (772)

    The Galactics arrived with their Battle fleet in 2052. Rather than being exterminated under a barrage of hell-burners, Earth joined a vast Empire that spanned the Milky Way. Our only worthwhile trade goods are our infamous mercenary legions, elite troops we sell to the highest alien bidder. In the third book in the series, James McGill is deployed on another alien world. His third interstellar tour is different in every way. Rather than meeting up with a primitive society, this time he’s headed to an advanced world.

    Jonathan says: "Different setting, B.V Larson never disapoints !"
    "…..James McGill is a Weapon with a Conscience....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Another fun installment in the continuing misadventures of James McGill and Legion Varis. This time they start the mission thinking they were on a milk run; of course things turn out to be not so simple. McGill is again faced with a situation that could get him killed permanently (permed in the jargon of the book). And again McGill responds with insubordination compelled with some sense of baseless morality to do the right thing. Larson has created an enduring character in James McGill that keeps getting more and more interesting with every new book. I like the dynamics of the Legion Varis chain of command. I like the space opera scenario of the series, with the technologically vastly superior Galactics making the rules. I like the way Mankind always finds a way to live within the system, but untamed enough that they are not afraid to bend the rules. You just can’t keep those spunky humans on a short leash. Most of all I like straight-shooter McGill always leading with his heart and too compulsive to reign in his tongue. This continues to be an interesting and entertaining series.

    Mark Boyett is excellent in his portrayal of the different characters in the book. He handles both male and female voices with deft adroitness. He has a great sense of the sarcastic, a quality I much appreciate in a narrator.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Reamde

    • UNABRIDGED (38 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Neal Stephenson
    • Narrated By Malcolm Hillgartner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3897)
    Performance
    (3413)
    Story
    (3449)

    Richard Forthrast created T’Rain, a multibillion-dollar, massively multiplayer online role-playing game. But T’Rain’s success has also made it a target. Hackers have struck gold by unleashing REAMDE, a virus that encrypts all of a player’s electronic files and holds them for ransom. They have also unwittingly triggered a deadly war beyond the boundaries of the game’s virtual universe - and Richard is at ground zero.

    ShySusan says: "Not perfect, but worth a listen."
    "…..Paradox of Pot-Boiler and Character Study....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    What begins as a geek hacker-gamer mystery quickly escalates into a full blown spy thriller with Russian Mobsters, rich (though far from helpless) damsels in distress, and British-born Jihadists. The book is full of great characters and exciting situations. I have enjoyed several other Neal Stephenson novels very much including the farcical and fun Snowcrash the massive Cryptonomicon and his multi-volume exploration of the dawn of the scientific age: The Baroque Cycle. This here is a whole different type of story. REAMDE is akin to a patriotic thriller novel but twice as long and three times more convoluted. The similarity between them all is in the quality of the writing—all are engaging and nicely done. I continue to be impressed, paradoxically, with the variety and consistency of the work of Neal Stephenson.

    After a brief period I quickly became accustomed to Malcolm Hillgartner as the voice of REAMDE. He provides great pacing and emotes his various characterization with style and aplomb. Occasionally his characterizations are worthy of a rewind just to hear him turn a phrase in a marvelous accent. Sometimes he fades into the background and the story seems to be emanating directly from your brain. Always he delivers the text better that I could have read it silently to myself.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Republic of Thieves: Gentleman Bastard Series, Book 3

    • UNABRIDGED (23 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Scott Lynch
    • Narrated By Michael Page
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1757)
    Performance
    (1628)
    Story
    (1636)

    After their adventures on the high seas, Locke and Jean are brought back to earth with a thump. Jean is mourning the loss of his lover, and Locke must live with the fallout of crossing the all-powerful magical assassins the Bonds Magi. It is a fall-out that will pit both men against Locke's own long-lost love. Sabetha is Locke's childhood sweetheart, the love of Locke's life, and now it is time for them to meet again. Employed on different sides of a vicious dispute between factions of the Bonds, Sabetha has just one goal-to destroy Locke forever.

    David says: "A transition and a preface"
    "…..Magical Mystery Cure....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Filled with flashbacks to the time of their apprenticeship under Master Chain the Thief Maker, this novel follows Locke and John first in the present time and then in the past in a series of comic misadventures. Always they practice their religion, reliving people of their money in the name of the Crooked Warden. This novel lacks the exciting story of the second book—tending to get side-tracked with the long flashback scenes of the play production company—but still manages to be entertaining.

    Michael Page again delivers an energetic dramatic performance that, at times, reaches brilliance.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Red Seas Under Red Skies

    • UNABRIDGED (25 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Scott Lynch
    • Narrated By Michael Page
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2421)
    Performance
    (1947)
    Story
    (1949)

    After a brutal battle with the underworld that nearly destroyed him, Locke Lamora and his trusted sidekick, Jean, fled the island city of their birth and landed on the exotic shores of Tal Verrar to nurse their wounds. But even at this westernmost edge of civilization, they can't rest for long - and they are soon back doing what they do best: stealing from the undeserving rich and pocketing the proceeds for themselves.

    Anthony says: "This is how you write a series!"
    "…..Blackmailed to Fly the Jolly Roger....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This series came to life with this second book. Now that we know the characters of Locke and John their exploits take sail. Their love for pilferage gets them into some very dicey situations that are festooned with danger, (mis)adventure and comedy. This is a great big fun book that will keep you entertained from the first chapter to the last. Unexpectedly tightly plotted, the action takes Locke and John from one peril to another, first operating within their comfort zone—thieving and running confidence games—to being cast adrift in a nautical word of freebooters where their only assets are their wits. This novel has a strong plot that elevates is far above the first.

    Michael Page tailors his performance to the over-the-top nature of the action in the story. His voicing is expertly energetic and melodramatic as the story requires. As a result this fun book is made even more fun by listening to his dramatic portrayal. Sit back and let Michael Page tell you a rousing story.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Lies of Locke Lamora

    • UNABRIDGED (21 hrs and 59 mins)
    • By Scott Lynch
    • Narrated By Michael Page
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3814)
    Performance
    (3060)
    Story
    (3063)

    An orphan's life is harsh---and often short---in the island city of Camorr, built on the ruins of a mysterious alien race. But born with a quick wit and a gift for thieving, Locke Lamora has dodged both death and slavery, only to fall into the hands of an eyeless priest known as Chains---a man who is neither blind nor a priest. A con artist of extraordinary talent, Chains passes his skills on to his carefully selected "family" of orphans---a group known as the Gentlemen Bastards.

    Luke A. Reynolds says: "Stupendous, but be warned."
    "…..Meet Two Lovable Rogues ....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a very likable start to the series. Scott Lynch gives his main characters a detailed back-story so that we feel that we know and understand the life of crime that Locke and John are thrown into. A variety of misadventures ensues to let us know that crime does not pay, at least not forever. As is typical of caper stories humor is a steady companion to these exploits of the Gentlemen Bastards. This book is entertaining and the next is even more fun.

    Michael Page gives an enthusiastic performance, attaining emotional heights that lend to the already considerable fun.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Dark Defiles: A Land Fit for Heroes, Book 3

    • UNABRIDGED (24 hrs)
    • By Richard K. Morgan
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    Overall
    (80)
    Performance
    (73)
    Story
    (74)

    Ringil Eskiath, a reluctant hero viewed as a corrupt degenerate by the very people who demand his help, has traveled far in search of the Illwrack Changeling, a deathless human sorcerer-warrior raised by the bloodthirsty Aldrain, former rulers of the world. Separated from his companions - Egar the Dragonbane and Archeth - Ringil risks his soul to master a deadly magic that alone can challenge the might of the Changeling.

    Trip Williams says: "Waited A LONG Time For This one!"
    "…..NC-17 Sword and Sorcery….."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Richard Morgan’s third entry into the fantasy genre again downplays the explicit scenes that were so prominent in the first book. I am trying to be discrete here. It is evident that there has been a conscious decision to be a little less in-your-face on such gratuitous scenes at the end of this series. Here the events of the trilogy are allowed to unfold without too much of the rainbow desensitization techniques he employed so copiously in the first installment—and for this I am grateful. What we are left with is a quite mundane sword-and-sorcery novel. The three main characters are back again and live up to their nicknames in every sense. It is fun to see them in action. And nobody does action better than Morgan.

    At the end of the day I think that I failed to fully engage with this series because of the aforementioned salacious elements and so have not really much cared what happens to the characters. There is a dearth of redeeming social value here. As a result I just let the audio play out and tried to follow the plot, which at times was difficult because the action seems focused more on the grubby details of mercenary life than it does on the grander story arc with the fate of the world at stake. This is not, therefore, an epic fantasy by any means. The unfolding Duenda war feels like little more than a manufactured crisis to allow the characters to misbehave. Alfred Hitchcock would call this the MacGuffin—the thing the characters in the story care about who facilitate the action that the audience cares about. The characters want to save the world and we in the audience want to witness them hacking and slashing their way to victory. So, while this series may have broken ground in introducing the genre to a sympathetic portrayal of an openly gay main character, it is pretty standard Sword and Sorcery fare otherwise. Knowing the dizzying heights that Richard Morgan is capable of hitting in his Science Fiction novels, this is a bit of a letdown.

    Simon Vance is a little too subdued for my tastes in his reading of this book. With such flamboyant characters the story would have been better served with a more emotional rendering in the dialog scenes. Vance is excellent in translating the words on the page into sounds in your ear. For the most part he is unobtrusive and this makes it possible for him to become the sub-vocal voice-in-your-head that every reader experiences when reading a book on your own.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Tokyo Raider: A Tale of the Grimnoir Chronicles

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 8 mins)
    • By Larry Correia
    • Narrated By Bronson Pinchot
    Overall
    (421)
    Performance
    (387)
    Story
    (390)

    With the Japanese Imperium at war with the Soviet Union, and the United States watching cautiously on the sidelines, Second Lieutenant Joe Sullivan of the U.S. Marines is sent on a dangerous mission to Tokyo. The Russians have Summoned a demon of epic proportions to attack the city, and all that stands in its deadly path is an untested Japanese super-robot. Now, Joe is at the controls, his gravity-spiking Power at the ready. But that is one huge, mean Demon....

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "…..The Enemy of My Enemy is My Friend....."
    "…..The Enemy of My Enemy is My Friend....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Now twenty years after WARBOUND we learn, in passing, what Francis and Fae are up to. The son of Jake and Origami joins forces with the Imperium to defeat a foe that could threaten the world if not stopped on the Island. Knowing that Larry Correia is still playing in the Grimnoir world leaves hope for a follow-up novel in the future. This little teaser makes me want more.

    Bronson Pinchot is top-notch as usual.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Murder on the Orient Elite: A Tale of the Grimnoir Chronicles

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 14 mins)
    • By Larry Correia
    • Narrated By Bronson Pinchot
    Overall
    (206)
    Performance
    (189)
    Story
    (187)

    In this brand-new Grimnoir Chronicles story written exclusively for Audible, it's 1937 - four years after the Grimnoir Society defeated the magical alien force known as The Power. "Heavy" Jake Sullivan is summoned by his oddest ally, Dr. Wells, to stop the bombing of a new ultra-luxury airship. Amid the glitz, the gambling, and the high-society types, Sullivan races time to hunt for the saboteur. But surrounded by a blimp-full of Germans, Russians, Imperium Iron Guard, and other magical enemies - where can he even begin?

    Matthew E. Bowman says: "An Excellent Teaser"
    "…..Travel in Style....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a fine short story set four years after the events in WARBOUND. It was great to keep up with Jake Sullivan and the Alienist. The real joy was hearing Bronson Pinchot exercise his talents again.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Chapterhouse Dune

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By Frank Herbert
    • Narrated By Euan Morton, Katherine Kellgren, Scott Brick, and others
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (769)
    Performance
    (458)
    Story
    (470)

    The desert planet Arrakis, called Dune, has been destroyed. Now, the Bene Gesserit, heirs to Dune's power, have colonized a green world - and are tuning it into a desert, mile by scorched mile. Chapterhouse Dune is the last book Frank Herbert wrote before his death and stunning climax to the epic Dune legend that will live on forever.

    Loren A Goodwin says: "Unchallenged Series Finale"
    "…..Bucket list complete....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Back in the day I read the original DUNE and then followed with DUNE MESSIAH and CHILDREN OF DUNE, but then I stopped because I didn't like the direction the series was going. Over the intervening years I kept hearing high praise for the rest of the series. I just wasn't motivated enough to undertake reading all six books. But now that they are available on Audio I thought I would give it a try. After all I had been richly rewarded in a similar situation involving the works of Neal Stephenson. (I had avoided The Baroque Cycle after loving Snowcrash but disliking The Diamond Age) So, in the case of the Dune novels I felt compelled to check off this nagging omission from my bucket list. I was hopefully expecting a buried treasure. Sadly, my original estimation was confirmed. The original DUNE is wonderful and inventive, fresh and new. The balance of the Dune novels are slow plodding—focused too much on fanciful, imagined philosophy. The second book, DUNE MESSIAH, reads like an outline—just advancing the plot so the third, CHILDREN OF DUNE can be told. This third book has some mildly interesting characters and promises a Space Opera scale expansion of the story for the remaining novels. The fourth, GOD EMPEROR OF DUNE, documents the tyrannical reign of human-turned-worm Leto II but does not make good use of the vast scale of a multiple-planet empire. The creepy giant larvae-like emperor, and his entire dialog, seems less then majestic or oppressive, as later recollections will portray his reign. The idea is there but the execution is lacking. The next, HERETICS OF DUNE, advances the plot but leaves much to be desired when it comes to holding my interest; which it could have done with more interesting people or with witty dialog (Again the reader is referred to The Baroque Cycle). And this last novel is no improvement. Mercifully, Frank Herbert ended his series with CHAPTERHOUSE DUNE. This last novel has the same feel as the previous two books. I did not like it. And unless someone can convince me that the other Dune books, written by Frank Herbert’s son are of a completely different quality, my exploration of Dune is at an end.

    As a public service I can say that if you enjoy exploring the outlining of a future society based on treachery and long range planning—but without fleshing out the characters or establishing an engaging storyline, then the last five Dune novels may be for you. My chief complaint is that the new characters which necessarily populate the later novels are just not very interesting. I was never made to care about them and so had a hard time following their concerns.

    I sympathize with the plight of the narrators. The dissertation-like nature of the text as a sociological treatise demands a slow monotone reading, and the narrators faithfully comply.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.