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Tim Valenta

Tim

AZ, USA | Member Since 2010

ratings
68
REVIEWS
22
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
2
HELPFUL VOTES
57

  • The Breach

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 35 mins)
    • By Patrick Lee
    • Narrated By Jeff Gurner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (385)
    Performance
    (227)
    Story
    (224)

    Thirty years ago, in a facility buried beneath a vast Wyoming emptiness, an experiment gone awry accidentally opened a door. It is the world’s best-kept secret—and its most terrifying. Trying to regain his life in the Alaskan wilds, ex-con/ex-cop Travis Chase stumbles upon an impossible scene: a crashed 747 passenger jet filled with the murdered dead, including the wife of the President of the United States.

    Tim Valenta says: "Unspeakably surprised; No regrets"
    "Unspeakably surprised; No regrets"
    Overall

    I chose to buy this book for the sole reason that Jeff Gurner reads it. I had never heard of the author nor the particular title. I finished Jeff Gurner's other reads, namely Daemon and Freedom (TM), and was blown away by his performances. On that single criterion, I chose this title, along with the help of another reviewer which said the book was a wild ride.

    Aside from the predictably fantastic narrator, the book was shorter than the other books I've purchased, by about half the length. That being said, the writing was extremely well paced, and I not once felt like it was moving more quickly than I thought comfortable, nor did it move too slowly. It's the kind of story I could see made into an action movie of some sort (though I don't think it's necessarily the right material for a boring Hollywood thriller).

    Up until the very end, the book has several tight turns that completely change the game, and I have to admit that I couldn't see any of them coming. Everything that felt like a silly plot failure turns out to be accounted for, and I couldn't have asked for a better total experience.

    Something that I couldn't gather from the description of the book on Audible: the story is a sci-fi one, where the plot is based around some fairly supernatural objects. Luckily, the sci-fi is coherently mixed into the real world, so that very little of the story feels so far fetched so as to render it too "out there".

    Brilliant book. Absolutely loved it. Another slam-dunk performance for Mr. Gurner, and I must say that I'll be interested in anything else that the author, Patrick Lee, has to write.

    10 of 10 people found this review helpful
  • The Way of Kings: Book One of The Stormlight Archive

    • UNABRIDGED (45 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Brandon Sanderson
    • Narrated By Kate Reading, Michael Kramer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (10240)
    Performance
    (7713)
    Story
    (7756)

    Roshar is a world of stone and storms. Uncanny tempests of incredible power sweep across the rocky terrain so frequently that they have shaped ecology and civilization alike. Animals hide in shells, trees pull in branches, and grass retracts into the soilless ground. Cities are built only where the topography offers shelter. It has been centuries since the fall of the ten consecrated orders known as the Knights Radiant, but their Shardblades and Shardplate remain: mystical swords and suits of armor.

    Lore says: "Wow - 45 hours long and leaves you wanting more!"
    "Woah"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a hugely satisfying story. Very emotionally powerful in those last several hours. That ending. This is going to be an incredible series.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Hero of Ages: Mistborn, Book 3

    • UNABRIDGED (27 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Brandon Sanderson
    • Narrated By Michael Kramer
    Overall
    (6163)
    Performance
    (4206)
    Story
    (4239)

    The conclusion of the Mistborn trilogy fulfills all the promise of the first two books. Revelations abound, connections rooted in early chapters of the series click into place, and surprises, as satisfying as they are stunning, blossom like fireworks to dazzle and delight. It all leads up to a finale unmatched for originality and audacity that will leave listeners shaking their heads in wonder, as if awaking from an amazing dream.

    Julio says: "Well concluded!"
    "Juggling with 37 balls, doesn't drop any"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book's job is a little different from the previous two. It's easy to tell that from the opening words of this one's subtext narration that opens/closes each chapter.

    There's so much going on here, which is an important part of why I think so highly of this book. It's not just an ending. It's not just about finally giving a reason for mists. It's not just about one gem of cleverness that carries the rest of the book. The whole thing is purposeful, from beginning to end.

    Some of that purpose is revealed as you go by the chapter introductions, which feels a little weird sometimes, like it's giving you information for free, without bothering to do storytelling to accomplish that revelation. But it's okay: let the author give that part up so that he can move along with the other host of things he's going to do his storytelling with.

    The cleverness of this book lies—I think—in the way it lets you feel like you're solving problems on your own. It's not even trying to trick you, so it doesn't feel like you're risking your credibility to believe in your hunches. And in fact you're probably right about your hunches, but you can't justify HOW you're right because the story still needs to prove everything. And that turns out to be more fun.

    And that's the nature of this book's little journey: it has a stockpile of secrets it's going to use, and it's okay that some of them are solvable by the reader, because, as they say, "there's a lot more where that came from." But really, no matter how many you figure out, there are revelations in this book that evolve the meaning of all that came before.

    Given this ending, I'm entirely confident that when I soon go back and list the original unmodified prophecies, all of them will fit, even though this book didn't highlight the occurrences the way it tried to do with the second book. The second book spent so much time yanking you around with false variants of the prophecies, but this one leaves so much to be rediscovered with the knowledge that the ending brings.

    Anyway, this story is one of the most sturdy pieces of fiction I've had the pleasure to read in a long time. It resorts to exactly zero tricks to cheat its way out of the dire circumstances. That's typically why I like long science fiction stories that have no choice but to do it without cheating or to go home, but this one was perhaps more expert in this respect.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Well of Ascension: Mistborn, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (29 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Brandon Sanderson
    • Narrated By Michael Kramer
    Overall
    (6535)
    Performance
    (4496)
    Story
    (4529)

    The impossible has been accomplished. The Lord Ruler - the man who claimed to be god incarnate and brutally ruled the world for a thousand years - has been vanquished. But Kelsier, the hero who masterminded that triumph, is dead too, and now the awesome task of building a new world has been left to his young protégé, Vin, the former street urchin who is now the most powerful Mistborn in the land, and to the idealistic young nobleman she loves.

    Robert says: "It keeps getting even better"
    "Takes it slower, makes it perfect"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The pace of this book is more like what I'm accustomed to from the type of science fiction that I enjoy. I worried every now and then that it was spending too much time just wandering in storytelling land without adding value...

    But then. Then you read the last chapter and understand the scope of the war, the depth of the deceit. Then you go and buy the third one without waiting for a credit.

    This book is the one that gives power to the third one. And you can't imagine to what extent the finale relies on all that came before until the last pages of the third book.

    Without the next book, this one would only deserve maybe four stars, but because of the foresight and careful crafting (some of which is not obvious during this book), I give it 5.

    That is all. You should read it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Cloud Atlas

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 33 mins)
    • By David Mitchell
    • Narrated By Scott Brick, Cassandra Campbell, Kim Mai Guest, and others
    Overall
    (3179)
    Performance
    (2377)
    Story
    (2388)

    A reluctant voyager crossing the Pacific in 1850; a disinherited composer blagging a precarious livelihood in between-the-wars Belgium; a high-minded journalist in Governor Reagan's California; a vanity publisher fleeing his gangland creditors; a genetically modified "dinery server" on death-row; and Zachry, a young Pacific Islander witnessing the nightfall of science and civilisation: the narrators of Cloud Atlas hear each other's echoes down the corridor of history.

    Elizabeth says: "thoroughly enjoyed"
    "Not as dramatic as the movie, but subtly strong"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    There's probably a whole lot of room for analysis in the various parts of the stories. I haven't the mind for doing it, since it brings me back to writing analytical essays on The Great Gatsby back in school once upon a time.

    If you enjoyed the film version of this, I recommend the book for the completion of certain details on the Sonmi timeline, which is far more complicated than the movie is able to show you.

    That said, Luisa Rey's part 2 story kind of made me consider beating myself with a heated toaster. It started to feel like it was making stuff up in order to fill a word count, so that it wasn't shorter than the rest of the book's parts.

    The storytelling pace is pretty different, given the way the story is broken up. You really have to look at each piece as its own set of storytelling goals. The last part, for example, is not particularly any more dramatic than the second-to-last, or the third.

    At times, I felt as though the themes described by the author are perhaps themselves more interesting than the stories the author chose to describe those themes. In other words, he tells you a story and makes you think about X and Y, which are themselves the interesting topics. The characters and stories are sometimes less memorable, by comparison.

    Good book, but I wouldn't rush it if you've got your eye on something else.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Final Empire: Mistborn Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (24 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By Brandon Sanderson
    • Narrated By Michael Kramer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (8168)
    Performance
    (5623)
    Story
    (5659)

    For a thousand years the ash fell and no flowers bloomed. For a thousand years the Skaa slaved in misery and lived in fear. For a thousand years the Lord Ruler, the "Sliver of Infinity," reigned with absolute power and ultimate terror, divinely invincible. Then, when hope was so long lost that not even its memory remained, a terribly scarred, heart-broken half-Skaa rediscovered it in the depths of the Lord Ruler's most hellish prison.

    Aaron Brown says: "Unique Magic system, good plot twists."
    "Coming from sci-fi—Not bad."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Once you've whetted your taste for well-crafted science fiction, it can sometimes feel dull to read something less painstakingly assembled. Fantasy, like Science Fiction, being a popular genre, I had to build up some faith to jump in and trust the author.

    The magic system here is clearly a masterpiece in its own right. It deftly avoids some of the commonly mind-numbing aspects of magic: 1) calling everything magic, 2) failing to justify why anything works, 3) failing to limit magic users with anything other than their mood.

    These frustrations are avoided by 1) naming the magic what it really is to the people, including its variations, 2) providing the push/pull lines to metals, which gives you a handle on the mechanical aspect of imagining what it must be like for the character, and 3) providing fuels.

    The system is balanced, and includes shadowed areas where knowledge has been lost. It works extremely well.


    Beyond the Allomancy mechanics, the story is also sturdy. Only once near the end did I get scared that the whole thing was a religious allegory, but I think that was just one component of what Sanderson was doing with just one of the characters, which provides a convincing stage for the next book. I was happy with his treatment of the situation and I think he did it correctly.


    I recommend this story, and if you're oriented for the details, you'll notice lots of things that are brought up in the book that aren't at all addressed in this book, which keeps the ground fertile for the followup stories.


    I recommend this book because it's good, even if you're not always into the slightly more fantastical works of fiction.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Great North Road

    • UNABRIDGED (36 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Peter F. Hamilton
    • Narrated By Toby Longworth
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (967)
    Performance
    (872)
    Story
    (879)

    A century from now, thanks to a technology allowing instantaneous travel across light-years, humanity has solved its energy shortages, cleaned up the environment, and created far-flung colony worlds. The keys to this empire belong to the powerful North family - composed of successive generations of clones. Yet these clones are not identical. For one thing, genetic errors have crept in with each generation. For another, the original three clone "brothers" have gone their separate ways, and the branches of the family are now friendly rivals more than allies. Or maybe not so friendly....

    Flapjack says: "Get the Timeline and Cast of Characters"
    "Missing something, but a good story"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I really felt that this was missing something as I closed in on the final hours of the book. I felt uncommitted to the story for the entire first half, waiting for something (anything) to happen. Finally in the fifth part you get the bigger picture, but even now that I've completed the book, I feel like a couple of things were executed on in a funny way.

    Right at first, I was kind of afraid that the detective premise would be a rehash of a Paula Myo circumstance from Pandora's Star and the followup books. I wasn't going to be super enthusiastic about that sort of lack of imagination, but Hamilton really does nothing for you to alleviate that fear: nothing happens. No really. For 18.25 hours, nearly nothing happens.

    It's not for a lack of shifting perspective either. The story is built on a lot of flashback material, which at first feels like a crude LOST-style maneuver. Entire scenes in the present are created and inhabited just so that you can go back in time 20 years. Which could have been fine, but nothing happened in the present, and nothing helpful happened in the flashback. One flashback, a pilot, has a nice colorful flashback story, but Angela and the others are all severely lacking, because telling you what happened would sort of undermine the whole set of mysteries in the character timeline. It very very obviously gives you only what you need, showfully leaving out material that is clearly important.

    So for over 18 hours, you've got nothing to chew on but really empty flashbacks that, while interesting at first, are actually lacking substance.

    The worst of it is really just that the mystery at the heart of the book feels extremely manufactured after a while. Flashbacks are clearly incomplete, probably to instill doubt about the identity of a murderer. But once you finally get the missing 30 second memory, it's nearly uninteresting. Not irrelevant, just not impressive for the core of a huge mystery.

    The second half of the book makes it good. The first half is a character-building experience, I grant you, but man was it drawn out. I was even expecting that, but was still surprised.

    If the book has any weakness, it's one of managing expectations. I say that with an open mind, having considered several angles.

    The whole story looks great from the bird's eye view, but when I was in the thick of some of its parts I found myself just listening to an extra hour or two just to cut through and absorb more, to compress the experience and convince myself I'm interested in what happens next.

    I enjoyed it, and the end is good. I gave it a good rating, because it's a good story. My qualms come from stylistic preference, especially held up against Hamilton's previous previous sci-fi work. I think Alastair Reynolds has given me a taste for heavier science components woven into all that storycrafting (which I generally enjoy, mind you).

    My advice: if you're unsure about getting the book, don't rush to this one at the expense of something else you're excited for. This one will be waiting for you when you're ready. On an my impromptu eventfulness scale of 1-10 (say, 1Q84 to Daemon) this is a 5, while I'd place Pandora's Star and related works in the 7-8 range.

    8 of 8 people found this review helpful
  • Pushing Ice

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Alastair Reynolds
    • Narrated By John Lee
    Overall
    (1972)
    Performance
    (1640)
    Story
    (1655)

    2057. Humanity has raised exploiting the solar system to an art form. Bella Lind and the crew of her nuclear-powered ship, the Rockhopper, push ice. They mine comets. And they're good at it. The Rockhopper is nearing the end of its current mission cycle, and everyone is desperate for some much-needed R & R, when startling news arrives from Saturn: Janus, one of Saturn's ice moons, has inexplicably left its natural orbit and is now heading out of the solar system at high speed.

    Jesse says: "Proof that a good story doesn't require a trilogy"
    "Glad I finally read this one"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I've read nearly everything else by the author, and for some reason avoided spending the credit on this book for what I thought were shaky reviews. While the audio suffers from some bizarrely short scene shifts in the recording (not the narrator's fault, mind you), this is a much more interesting independent story than I was prepared to expect.

    Before picking it up, the notion of a trite story about Saturn's moon flying away sounded boring to me, a drama cooked up around the local solar system. Held against Revelation Space or the newer and more primitive Blue Remembered Earth, I was thinking this story would be the half-baked stillborn that had no choice but to exist between the two story types.

    Welp. I was wrong. The very idea that you aren't sure what Reynolds could possibly do with the story to develop it beyond the synopsis is exactly why you should dive into this one. The scale of it is more immense than you're prepared for, and it's brimming with unknowns, contrary to the opening setting in the local solar system. The only story with a larger storytelling scale is perhaps the Galactic North short story, as even House of Suns took place almost entirely within the far future, without having to drag you all the way there.

    Very glad that I wised up and bought this book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Terminal World

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By Alastair Reynolds
    • Narrated By John Lee
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (656)
    Performance
    (411)
    Story
    (416)

    Spearpoint, the last human city, is an atmosphere-piercing spire of vast size. Clinging to its skin are the zones, a series of semi-autonomous city-states, each of which enjoys a different---and rigidly enforced---level of technology. Following an infiltration mission that went tragically wrong, Quillon has been living incognito, working as a pathologist in the district morgue.

    DAVID says: "This ain't your fathers Alastair Reynolds"
    "Steamfiction of the far-future"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I think it's clear at this point that after completing the many Revelation Space books that the author decided to explore a fascination with old technologies and settings, perhaps dating back to 2004 when he did Century Rain and heavily involved 1950s Paris. This time there is a spread of technology levels, but the book fundamentally takes place in near-zero technology levels, lending the story to wooden airships bound to the principles of air travel and gun warfare.

    For a long while I was dissatisfied with the trend of the story, but Reynolds always has that one part near the end of his books that suddenly drop intellectual bombs and grant you insider knowledge that sometimes even the characters can't fully grasp. This book is no exception, but by the end I selfishly wanted just a bit more out of the world's lore.

    If I'm being honest, the strength of this story is that it gives you the silent treatment about the outside universe, although there is plenty of speculation provided by some characters. Reynolds even goes through his traditional trouble of presenting plausible explanations for complex problems, and then invalidates the characters' hypothesis so that he can make sure you know that he's in strict control of the story progression.

    The untold story behind Terminal World is the way that things arrived into their current state, which would have been a stellar short story, like in the Galactic North collection, but that is likely never to happen. Besides, the strength of this as a story is, again, the assumption that humanity knows very little anymore about its past, save for vague scripture that presumably dates back to the incidents that resulted in the state of the world.

    I think that it's also worth making a note, as tangential as it might be, that the relationship development in this story is subtly more powerful than I expected. Character development is always a key area for Reynolds, but the untold and between-the-lines development of Meroka with those around her, including a deniable interest in Curtana, her relaxation around Quillon, and her affinity for the young Nimcha and her loaned storybooks.

    Also... assuming you have completed the story, consider the Wikipedia information in the section titled "Which World?" (check revision history in case it changes). You might have horribly missed some very interesting information about "Earth".

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • 1Q84

    • UNABRIDGED (46 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Haruki Murakami, Jay Rubin (translator), Philip Gabriel (translator)
    • Narrated By Allison Hiroto, Marc Vietor, Mark Boyett
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4026)
    Performance
    (3518)
    Story
    (3485)

    The year is 1984 and the city is Tokyo.

    A young woman named Aomame follows a taxi driver's enigmatic suggestion and begins to notice puzzling discrepancies in the world around her. She has entered, she realizes, a parallel existence, which she calls 1Q84 - "Q" is for "question mark". A world that bears a question....

    Dr. says: "Slow, Strange, and (ultimately) Satisfying"
    "Imaginative, somehow mixed with literary Realism"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I... have struggled for about 5 minutes trying to figure out how to start a review for this book. From a purely imaginative point of view, this is a really nice story. And the narration is pretty good. The translation holds steady, even though two different translators worked on the 3 sub-books that comprise the story.

    But... I have no idea what 1984 has to do with any of this. It could have been set in any year at all, provided some contextual details were altered. The tie into 1984's name adds nothing to this story. I don't even really know what the book is about, having finished it. First and foremost, I suppose it's just a love story from the characters' childhoods, told through some distorted reality. I loved the insane pieces of the 1Q84 world, but they lead nowhere. As if to reinforce this point, the last we hear of 1Q84 is the same old events happening all over again, while the characters return home and the story ends.

    The author, even withstanding translation, has a superb talent with similes. Some of them get a little fluffy, but most are so accurate at making you feel the correct way about a subject that you really do see something from the character's perspective. It's a building appreciation that makes the characters worthy of your sympathy.

    However, a lot of effort seems to have gone into making the story just go on and on for the sake of having just one more "close one". I think I was pretty tolerant and willing to go along with it, but there were some points near the end where I was unsure what the author was trying to accomplish anymore. Again, I'm really open minded and willing, but I just don't know what the point was before it was clear the author just decided to wrap things up.

    In the end, this story doesn't make me want to look into the author's other works. I'm just as neutral about them before as I am now. It was an interesting experience. I guess I just wanted some more substance to the larger story. The storyline was practical enough, just not backed by any undeniably clear purpose. In that way, this story has more roots in Realism as a genre, providing that the story actually takes place in a fantasy-enhanced setting. There is romance and danger, but the larger story is traditional and unwavering in its goal to shadow the characters and have you witness their extreme caution, before it finally just unites them and sends them off into a sunrise.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • House of Suns

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 16 mins)
    • By Alastair Reynolds
    • Narrated By John Lee
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (920)
    Performance
    (600)
    Story
    (603)

    Six million years ago, at the very dawn of the starfaring era, Abigail Gentian fractured herself into a thousand male and female clones: the shatterlings. Sent out into the galaxy, these shatterlings have stood aloof as they document the rise and fall of countless human empires. They meet every 200,000 years to exchange news and memories of their travels with their siblings.

    Ethan M. says: "Science fiction in Deep time"
    "Not the strongest book, but a great exercise"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I didn't feel like this story had the same strong presence that the Revelation Space series demonstrates. Characters are less interesting for who they are, and instead are made entertaining based on how radical they are. Remote controlled paper men, to clones, to evolved biological masses, to mechanical men, to distributed cloud-like entities.

    It's a fine story, and it even comes loaded with Reynolds's signature hard science plot twist at the end. It doesn't appear to be set in the same universe as his Revelation Space set, so that might ultimately disappoint you, since there are no opportunities for familiar names or places to come up.

    By the end, I find myself still impressed with how Reynolds sticks to proportions and sub-lightspeed travel times (despite the ongoing question about *if* the barrier could be broken). The galaxy is a whopping big place, and the distance between galaxies is even more massive. It's calming to listen to more of his stories, where even millions of years from now, the most advanced of us still have to just hit the stasis pods and ride for decades and centuries to get places. It's proof, in my opinion, of the author's ability to properly weave a story, particularly one where the details and the timing and character motivations all mesh together as the story unfolds, avoiding reckless action-centric plot-less events.

    Reynolds is a great storyteller, and this is a good specimen of what we can do when starting fresh and trying to tackle hard science fiction from a new angle.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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