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Gary

Gary Las Cruces, NM, United States Member Since 2001

Letting the rest of the world go by

HELPFUL VOTES
708
ratings
REVIEWS
184
161
FOLLOWERS
FOLLOWING
124
2
  • "Probably the best Science book I've..."

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    There is not a wasted concept in this book. The author explains everything you need to understand about time and why he thinks it is real and how modern physics has taken it out of the equation. He starts with defining mathematics as the study of the unchanging. Math (in the Platonic/Western Thought way) is how how we sneak timelessness into our way of thinking about the universe. The Newtonian paradigm adds to taking time out of the equation by the way we always must consider a subset of the universe as a whole and we are the observers and we create the time, but the part under study never covers the whole universe. Time is external to that which is under study.

    The author explains "Boltzman's Brain" so that I finally understand what it means and why it's important, he explains entropy, entanglement, the standard model and Einstein's General relativity and how they relate to how we take time out of the model.

    This book will forever change the way I think about time. I think it is probably the best of all the 50 or so astrophysics/cosmology/physics books I've read and reviewed over the last 2 years.

    I highly recommend listening to this book. The narrator knew exactly when to have the mocking laugh, the inflection and so on. I suspect the author worked with the narrator to make the presentation that flawless.

    (p.s. At the core of this book lurks the question "why is there something instead of nothing". I just listened to Holt's book "Why does the world exist". It's mostly a philosophical book, but both this book and that book do complement each other and would make and excellent summer read).


    More

    Time Reborn: From the Crisis in Physics to the Future of the Universe

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 59 mins)
    • By Lee Smolin
    • Narrated By Sean Pratt
    Overall
    (92)
    Performance
    (80)
    Story
    (84)

    The Trouble with Physics argues that a limited notion of time is holding physics back. It's time for a major revolution in scientific thought. The reality of time could be the key to the next big breakthrough in theoretical physics. What if the laws of physics themselves were not timeless? What if they could evolve? Time Reborn offers a radical new approach to cosmology that embraces the reality of time and opens up a whole new universe of possibilities.

    Gary says: "Probably the best Science book I've listened to"
  • "Higgs from beginning to end of time"

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This was not an easy book to understand and the particle zoo plays a large role in the discussion and often I would lose my way only because the material is sometimes hard to follow, but the book covers everything you always wanted to know about the Higgs Boson and its field, but were afraid to ask.

    I absolutely loved the author's previous book, "From Eternity to Here", and couldn't wait for this book. He's such a good writer and explains better than almost anyone. There are enough good parts in this book to make the particle zoo part worth listening to.

    There's one important theme that runs through the book that will make the book easier to understand. That is these five words: "not observed waves, observed particles". In the background of the universe is the Higgs field and it is the vibration of this field that gives particles their mass. The author explains this and relates it to possible solutions to dark matter and dark energy.

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    The Particle at the End of the Universe: How the Hunt for the Higgs Boson Leads Us to the Edge of a New World

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Sean Carroll
    • Narrated By Jonathan Hogan
    Overall
    (114)
    Performance
    (98)
    Story
    (98)

    Scientists have just announced an historic discovery on a par with the splitting of the atom: The Higgs boson, the key to understanding why mass exists has been found. In The Particle at the End of the Universe, Caltech physicist and acclaimed writer Sean Carroll takes readers behind the scenes of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN to meet the scientists and explain this landmark event.

    Matthew says: "A History of Modern Particle Physics"
  • "Easy to remember all the stories in..."

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The author writes in a straightforward manner and explains the science in a highly entertaining manner. If I ever sit next to somebody in a waffle house who starts talking about his life stories, I can easily pivot into one of the five stories splendidly presented in this book. The writer was that good at telling the stories about the blunders, and having listened to it I can probably relate the whole book and it's major points without missing a beat. That tells me the book was well presented.

    The narrator made the book better than the written book. I found some of his voices a real hoot, particularly Darwin and Einstein. I would definitely recommend the audible version versus the written form of this book.

    For me, this book was a template for having worked in the real world surrounded around very smart people who would fall into the blunders that are illustrated by these five stories. I don't think the author realized how relevant the stories could be for most working stiffs and the kind of people we often have to work with.

    Instead of picking Einstein's blunder as the cosmological constant, he should have picked Einstein's failure to accept quantum mechanics after having co-discovered it and wasting his time on the GUT (grand unified theorem) outside of the context of quantum physics. I know why he picked the cosmological constant. It's a funner story to relate and is more relevant today because of the mystery of Dark Energy, and the word blunder is not usually associated with that for Einstein and the cosmological constant is.

    Overall, the stories are well presented, and it was narrated much better than it was written, but the author missed a great opportunity to make a better book about the foibles of life in general.

    More

    Brilliant Blunders: From Darwin to Einstein - Colossal Mistakes by Great Scientists That Changed Our Understanding of Life and the Universe

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 46 mins)
    • By Mario Livio
    • Narrated By Jeff Cummings
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (119)
    Performance
    (105)
    Story
    (106)

    We all make mistakes. Nobody’s perfect. Not even some of the greatest geniuses in history, as Mario Livio tells us in this marvelous story of scientific error and breakthrough. Charles Darwin, William Thomson (Lord Kelvin), Linus Pauling, Fred Hoyle, and Albert Einstein were all brilliant scientists. Each made groundbreaking contributions to his field - but each also stumbled badly. These five scientists expanded our knowledge of life on Earth, the evolution of the Earth itself, and the evolution of the universe, despite and because of their errors. As Mario Livio luminously explains, the scientific process advances through error.

    Gary says: "Easy to remember all the stories in the book"
  1. Time Reborn: From the Cri...
  2. The Particle at the End o...
  3. Brilliant Blunders: From ...
  4. .

A Peek at Ryan's Bookshelf

Helpful
Votes
1363
 
Somerville, MA, United States 260 REVIEWS / 325 ratings Member Since 2005 384 Followers / Following 14
 
Ryan's greatest hits:
  • Uncertainty: Einstein, Heisenberg, Bohr, and the Struggle for the Soul of Science

    "fascinating insight into the real drama of physics"

    Overall

    The early 20th century was by no means an orderly, calm period in the world of theoretical physics. New discoveries in relativity and quantum mechanics were casting increasing doubt on classical physics. Scientists were learning that some phenomena, taking place at the unseeable atomic level, seemed not to be deterministic and predictable, but probabilistic and not so predictable.

    Uncertainty provides an informative overview of the major players during this era, and explores the disarray that a changing state of knowledge brought to the physics community, with some more conservative figures, such as Einstein, advocating caution and their own belief that the universe could not truly be so disorderly, and younger physicists, such as Heisenberg, rejecting scientific orthodoxy and searching for the answers in more radical ideas. While I'm sure there are better books about physics and better biographies of famous scientists, this one does capture the division that quantum mechanics brought about among most the brilliant, legendary physicists, and their all-too human arguments as they struggled to make sense of its paradigm-shaking implications. The author also notes the background of political and social unrest taking place in Europe in the 1920s and 30s, raising the question of how much this drama may have been a part of the soul of the scientific drama.

    An interesting book.

  • Sync: How Order Emerges from Chaos in the Universe, Nature, and Daily Life

    "Engaging, but maybe better suited for non-audio"

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Self-organization -- it's a profoundly self-evident quality of nature, but one that so far has eluded much deep understanding in science. Strogatz makes it easy to see why: nature, from atoms up to cells up to societies, is made up of many non-linear components working together, and non-linear systems, with their feedback loops, impulses, and fractal components, are fiendishly difficult to get one's head around, nothing like the idealized systems we encounter in Freshman Physics. Yet, their non-linearity is the key to... well, maybe everything?

    Sync explores the synchronization phenomena inherent in many complex systems, the way they coordinate their actions with respect to time, building order out of seeming noise. From fireflies to circadian rhythms to swinging pendulums to brain neurons to orbiting bodies to Higgs boson fields, there's an eerie tendency in nature for things to fall in step.

    Despite being free of equations, it's a book that delves into some pretty dense territory, and might not be well suited to audiobook form. In most chapters, I found that a moment of daydreaming or distraction would have me rewinding to get back on track with the lecture. Strogatz spends a lot of time explaining abstract models, which held my interest as an engineer (the runners-on-a-track metaphor actually mirrored a traffic simulation I’d developed, which had sync issues of its own), but might appeal less to other readers. There are also some rather esoteric topics in physics, which I didn’t understand very well. I kinda wish he'd put those chapters towards the end, because I almost quit listening after one frustrating section dealing with spiral waves, which luckily turned out to be followed by a much more interesting and accessible overview of Chaos Theory. I also liked the chapters that explore networks and their characteristics (think of the connections between film actors, exemplified by the party game “Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon”).

    If you're hoping for some grand unifying theory of synchronization, you won't find it here, just an examination of some different systems in which sync is present and praise for the work of several different researchers. I wouldn’t have minded more resonance between the separate parts (as it were), but I was curious about the topic and the book was worth my time. It’s always cool to learn about a field in which many key developments have happened within my own lifetime. Strogatz convinced me that the qualities that make self-organizing systems difficult to model with traditional mathematics might be the same qualities that are most important to understand. As a software developer, I found it exciting to think about how computers will be used to further exploration of the universe’s emergent interconnectedness, and how discoveries might feed back into how we think about software design. We might even find out something profound.

    3.5 stars.

  • The Drunkard's Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives

    "Don't overlook the unpredictable"

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A better title for this book might be "How Humans Misunderstand Randomness". If you want to feel nervous about an upcoming performance review at work or day in court, Mlodinow can help you do so. Here, he shows how non-intuitive statistics and probability can be, and how people biased by their natural desire to attribute definite causes to events tend to discount the winds of chance. Consider how "brilliant" CEOs are often hired for enormous salaries, then fired a few years later when the company doesn't make the profits expected. But how much control does a typical CEO really have over all the factors that determine a company's near-term success? And consider how obvious the "clues" to Japan's WWII attack on Pearl Harbor looked in hindsight, but how they actually wouldn't have jumped out to analysts among all the other "noise" in the intelligence network. (These themes might be familiar to those who've read Nassim Taleb's book on unpredictability, The Black Swan.)

    On the other hand, when we *do* think about randomness, we often have incorrect expectations about its properties. Gamblers don't always realize that it's not unlikely for a roulette wheel to favor a certain color over many spins, even when the roulette wheel is behaving correctly. Or, think about some of the mistakes the legal system has made. An example is the couple in 1960s Los Angeles who were convicted of an attack on the basis of witness testimony that reported two people with similar appearances and a similar car. The prosecution cited the one-in-a-million odds that the criminals could be anyone else. Yet, they made a few critical mistakes: the variables weren't independent and Los Angeles is a city of multiple millions: the real odds were closer to two-in-three. Yikes.

    The Drunkard's Walk includes, along the way, a compelling history of the science of chance, covering figures such as Pascal, Bayes, Laplace, Brown (of Brownian Motion fame), and Einstein. Though I've studied probability and statistics before, as part of my college coursework, I find them to be fun subjects, and enjoyed the refresher (if not so much the reminders that our legal system is flawed). A bit of a nerdy book, but perfectly engaging.

  • Chaos: Making a New Science

    "Still a consciousness-expanding introduction"

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Chaos, the concept, is often explained in terms of a butterfly flapping its wings in one part of the world, which sets off a long chain of consequences leading to rain falling in another part of the world. It's an overworn cliche by now, but one that still gets to the heart of a quality of nature that scientists and mathematicians prior to the 20th century didn't really grasp. It was hardly their fault. Living in the age of slide rules and tables (or before), they can't really be blamed for focusing on phenomena that were predictable, linear, and led to stable outcomes, and ignoring those that seemed too noisy, erratic, and error-prone to be represented with an equation.

    Yet, as the age of computers dawned, it became clear that the "noise" in many natural systems wasn't error at all, but held its own elusive underlying order. The feedback loops in these systems would magnify initial discrepancies over time, but they would also perform a sort of self-correction, giving rise to repeated patterns and patterns-within-patterns -- similar, like the shape of clouds, but never exactly the same. It's now apparent that this complex dance between coherence and instability, between the macroscopic and the microscopic, drives many of nature's most interesting phenomena, from the branching of blood vessels into smaller ones, to how particles of smoke curl around each other, to the way a snowflake's shape reflects its journey through the atmosphere. Human consciousness itself seems to be an example of a chaotic, endlessly self-referential system.

    Chaos, the book, though written in 1987, still does an excellent job of connecting the discoveries that opened the door to Chaos Theory. Gleick introduces us to figures like Edward Lorenz, whose work in weather prediction revealed that tiny differences in input in even simple mathematical models could lead to vast differences in output over time; Robert May, who discovered chaotic patterns in population dynamics; and Benoit Mandelbrot, now considered the father of fractals. Along the way, he touches on fundamental concepts like strange attractors, fractal dimension, bifurcation, complex boundaries, and the Mandlebrot set (whose astonishing visual representation you've seen if you’ve set foot in a poster shop in the last 25 years).

    This is one of those books I'd recommend to people who already have some familiarity with the topic. While its purpose is introductory and there's little math, per se, I think the underlying profundities will be more obvious to readers who have taken a college-level math course or two or three. That disclaimer aside, I found Gleick's writing articulate, and seldom had much trouble visualizing what he was talking about, even listening to the audiobook. It's worth having the print edition on hand for the pictures and diagrams, but if you don't, the internet should suffice.

    Despite being 25 years old, Chaos remains an invigorating read, offering a sense of discoveries and inventions yet to be made, and demonstrating that separate fields like physics, chemistry, biology, information theory, computing, cognitive science, climatology, and economics aren't as separate as we might think. As bonus, a 2000s-era afterward in the audiobook provides a brief update of progress in some areas since the book's original publication, and some thoughts on its cultural impact.

What's Trending in Physics:

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    • By Walter Isaacson
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    Why we think it’s a great listen: You thought he was a stodgy scientist with funny hair, but Isaacson and Hermann reveal an eloquent, intense, and selfless human being who not only shaped science with his theories, but politics and world events in the 20th century as well. Based on the newly released personal letters of Albert Einstein, Walter Isaacson explores how an imaginative, impertinent patent clerk became the mind reader of the creator of the cosmos.

    Henrik says: "Surprise: Two books in one!"
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    In A Short History of Nearly Everything, Bill Bryson takes his ultimate journey - into the most intriguing and consequential questions that science seeks to answer. It's a dazzling quest, as this insatiably curious writer attempts to understand everything that has transpired from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization.

    Brent says: "This audio edition is abridged!"
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    The Alchemy of Air: A Jewish Genius, a Doomed Tycoon, and the Scientific Discovery That Fed the World but Fueled the Rise of Hitler (






UNABRIDGED) by Thomas Hager Narrated by Adam Verner

    The Alchemy of Air: A Jewish Genius, a Doomed Tycoon, and the Scientific Discovery That Fed the World but Fueled the Rise of Hitler

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    • By Thomas Hager
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    At the dawn of the 20th century, humanity was facing global disaster. Mass starvation, long predicted for the fast-growing population, was about to become a reality. A call went out to the worlds scientists to find a solution. This is the story of the two enormously gifted, fatally flawed men who found it: the brilliant, self-important Fritz Haber and the reclusive, alcoholic Carl Bosch. Together they discovered a way to make bread out of air, built city-sized factories, controlled world markets, and saved millions of lives.

    sarah says: "Riveting"
  • 4.5 (247 ratings)
    Einstein's Relativity and the Quantum Revolution: Modern Physics for Non-Scientists, 2nd Edition  by The Great Courses Narrated by Professor Richard Wolfson

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    • By The Great Courses
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    "It doesn't take an Einstein to understand modern physics," says Professor Wolfson at the outset of these 24 lectures on what may be the most important subjects in the universe: relativity and quantum physics. Both have reputations for complexity. But the basic ideas behind them are, in fact, simple and comprehensible by anyone. These dynamic and illuminating lectures begin with a brief overview of theories of physical reality starting with Aristotle and culminating in Newtonian or "classical" physics.

    Joel says: "Enjoyable lecutre"
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  • 4.5 (124 ratings)
    Particle Physics for Non-Physicists: A Tour of the Microcosmos  by The Great Courses Narrated by Professor Steven Pollock

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    • By The Great Courses
    • Narrated By Professor Steven Pollock
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    Would you like to know how the universe works? Scientists have been asking that question for a long time and have found that many of the answers can be found in the study of particle physics, the field that focuses on those impossibly tiny particles with unbelievably strange names - the hadrons and leptons, baryons and mesons, muons and gluons - so mystifying to the rest of us.

    Briggs Johnson says: "Fundamental understanding of fundamental stuff."
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    Mysteries of Modern Physics: Time  by The Great Courses Narrated by Professor Sean Carroll

    Mysteries of Modern Physics: Time

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    • By The Great Courses
    • Narrated By Professor Sean Carroll
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    Time rules our lives, woven into the very fabric of the universe-from the rising and setting of the sun to the cycles of nature, the thought processes in our brains, and the biorhythms in our day. Nothing so pervades our existence and yet is so difficult to explain. But now, in a series of 24 riveting lectures, you can grasp exactly why - as you take a mind-expanding journey through the past, present, and future, guided by a noted author and scientist.

    Michael says: "Get From Eternity to Here instead"
  • 4.3 (108 ratings)
    A Short History of Nearly Everything (






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    A Short History of Nearly Everything

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    • By Bill Bryson
    • Narrated By Bill Bryson
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    A Short History of Nearly Everything is Bill Bryson’s quest to find out everything that has happened from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization - how we got from there, being nothing at all, to here, being us. His challenge is to take subjects that normally bore the pants off most of us and see if there isn't some way to render them comprehensible to people who have never thought they could be interested in science. It's not so much about what we know, as about how we know what we know.

    Carolyn says: "If you only own one audio book, this is it!"
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    The Pleasure of Finding Things Out: The Best Short Works of Richard P. Feynman (






UNABRIDGED) by Richard P. Feynman Narrated by Sean Runnette

    The Pleasure of Finding Things Out: The Best Short Works of Richard P. Feynman

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 23 mins)
    • By Richard P. Feynman
    • Narrated By Sean Runnette
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
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    Performance
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    Story
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    The Pleasure of Finding Things Out is a magnificent treasury of the best short works of Richard P. Feynman, from interviews and speeches to lectures and printed articles. A sweeping, wide-ranging collection, it presents an intimate and fascinating view of a life in science - a life like no other. From his ruminations on science in our culture to his Nobel Prize acceptance speech, this book will delight anyone interested in the world of ideas.

  • Einstein: His Life and Universe (






UNABRIDGED) by Walter Isaacson Narrated by Edward Herrmann

    Einstein: His Life and Universe

    • UNABRIDGED (21 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Walter Isaacson
    • Narrated By Edward Herrmann
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3711)
    Performance
    (1660)
    Story
    (1671)

    Why we think it’s a great listen: You thought he was a stodgy scientist with funny hair, but Isaacson and Hermann reveal an eloquent, intense, and selfless human being who not only shaped science with his theories, but politics and world events in the 20th century as well. Based on the newly released personal letters of Albert Einstein, Walter Isaacson explores how an imaginative, impertinent patent clerk became the mind reader of the creator of the cosmos.

    Henrik says: "Surprise: Two books in one!"
  • Einstein's Relativity and the Quantum Revolution: Modern Physics for Non-Scientists, 2nd Edition  by The Great Courses Narrated by Professor Richard Wolfson

    Einstein's Relativity and the Quantum Revolution: Modern Physics for Non-Scientists, 2nd Edition

    • ORIGINAL (12 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By The Great Courses
    • Narrated By Professor Richard Wolfson
    Overall
    (247)
    Performance
    (217)
    Story
    (218)

    "It doesn't take an Einstein to understand modern physics," says Professor Wolfson at the outset of these 24 lectures on what may be the most important subjects in the universe: relativity and quantum physics. Both have reputations for complexity. But the basic ideas behind them are, in fact, simple and comprehensible by anyone. These dynamic and illuminating lectures begin with a brief overview of theories of physical reality starting with Aristotle and culminating in Newtonian or "classical" physics.

    Joel says: "Enjoyable lecutre"
  • Origins: Fourteen Billion Years of Cosmic Evolution

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs)
    • By Neil deGrasse Tyson, Donald Goldsmith
    • Narrated By Kevin Kenerly
    Overall
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    Performance
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    Story
    (0)

    Origins explains the soul-stirring leaps in our understanding of the cosmos. From the first image of a galaxy birth to Spirit rover's exploration of Mars, to the discovery of water on one of Jupiter's moons, coauthors Neil deGrasse Tyson and Donald Goldsmith conduct a galvanizing tour of the cosmos with clarity and exuberance.

  • A Brief History of Time (






UNABRIDGED) by Stephen Hawking Narrated by Michael Jackson

    A Brief History of Time

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Stephen Hawking
    • Narrated By Michael Jackson
    Overall
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    This landmark book is for those of us who prefer words to equations; this is the story of the ultimate quest for knowledge, the ongoing search for the secrets at the heart of time and space. Its author, Stephen W. Hawking, is arguably the greatest mind since Einstein. From the vantage point of the wheelchair, where he has spent the last 20 years trapped by Lou Gehrig's disease, Professor Hawking has transformed our view of the universe. A Brief History of Time is Hawking's classic introduction to today's most important scientific ideas.

    Jeff Parent says: "Great book, but...."
  •  
  • Parallel Worlds: A Journey Through Creation, Higher Dimensions, and the Future of the Cosmos (






UNABRIDGED) by Michio Kaku Narrated by Marc Vietor

    Parallel Worlds: A Journey Through Creation, Higher Dimensions, and the Future of the Cosmos

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Michio Kaku
    • Narrated By Marc Vietor
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1017)
    Performance
    (557)
    Story
    (550)

    In this thrilling journey into the mysteries of our cosmos, best-selling author Michio Kaku takes us on a dizzying ride to explore black holes and time machines, multidimensional space and, most tantalizing of all, the possibility that parallel universes may lay alongside our own.

    Robert says: "Don't be afraid"
  • Smashing Physics: Inside the Discovery of the Higgs Boson (






UNABRIDGED) by Jon Butterworth Narrated by Jonathan Keeble

    Smashing Physics: Inside the Discovery of the Higgs Boson

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 19 mins)
    • By Jon Butterworth
    • Narrated By Jonathan Keeble
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    The first insider account of the work at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the discovery of the Higgs particle - and what it all means for our understanding of the laws of nature. The discovery of the Higgs boson made headlines around the world. Two scientists, Peter Higgs and François Englert, whose theories predicted its existence, shared a Nobel Prize. The discovery was the culmination of the largest experiment ever run, the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

  • Our Mathematical Universe: My Quest for the Ultimate Nature of Reality (






UNABRIDGED) by Max Tegmark Narrated by Rob Shapiro

    Our Mathematical Universe: My Quest for the Ultimate Nature of Reality

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Max Tegmark
    • Narrated By Rob Shapiro
    Overall
    (218)
    Performance
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    Story
    (194)

    Max Tegmark leads us on an astonishing journey through past, present and future, and through the physics, astronomy, and mathematics that are the foundation of his work, most particularly his hypothesis that our physical reality is a mathematical structure and his theory of the ultimate multiverse. In a dazzling combination of both popular and groundbreaking science, he not only helps us grasp his often mind-boggling theories, but he also shares with us some of the often surprising triumphs and disappointments that have shaped his life as a scientist.

    Michael says: "Wow!"
  • 12 Essential Scientific Concepts  by The Great Courses Narrated by Professor Indre Viskontas

    12 Essential Scientific Concepts

    • ORIGINAL (12 hrs and 5 mins)
    • By The Great Courses
    • Narrated By Professor Indre Viskontas
    Overall
    (82)
    Performance
    (69)
    Story
    (69)

    Science is such a vast arena of knowledge that people looking for a better grasp of its secrets often wonder where to begin. The answer: with the essentials. Now, finally satisfy your desire for scientific inquiry in a way that makes this enormous field accessible, understandable, and undeniably captivating.

    Tanglebones says: "Excellent overview of major science concepts"
  •  
  • Einstein's Cosmos: How Albert Einstein's Vision Transformed Our Understanding of Space and Time: Great Discoveries (






UNABRIDGED) by Michio Kaku Narrated by Ray Porter

    Einstein's Cosmos: How Albert Einstein's Vision Transformed Our Understanding of Space and Time: Great Discoveries

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Michio Kaku
    • Narrated By Ray Porter
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (428)
    Performance
    (396)
    Story
    (396)

    A dazzling tour of the universe as Einstein saw it. How did Albert Einstein come up with the theories that changed the way we look at the world? By thinking in pictures. Michio Kaku, leading theoretical physicist (a cofounder of string theory) and best-selling science storyteller, shows how Einstein used seemingly simple images to lead a revolution in science. With originality and expertise, Kaku uncovers the surprising beauty that lies at the heart of Einstein's cosmos

    david says: "Relatively Wonderful"
  • Particle Physics for Non-Physicists: A Tour of the Microcosmos  by The Great Courses Narrated by Professor Steven Pollock

    Particle Physics for Non-Physicists: A Tour of the Microcosmos

    • ORIGINAL (12 hrs and 23 mins)
    • By The Great Courses
    • Narrated By Professor Steven Pollock
    Overall
    (124)
    Performance
    (116)
    Story
    (112)

    Would you like to know how the universe works? Scientists have been asking that question for a long time and have found that many of the answers can be found in the study of particle physics, the field that focuses on those impossibly tiny particles with unbelievably strange names - the hadrons and leptons, baryons and mesons, muons and gluons - so mystifying to the rest of us.

    Briggs Johnson says: "Fundamental understanding of fundamental stuff."
  • 36 Big Ideas  by The Great Courses Narrated by Professor Bart D. Ehrman, Professor Daniel W. Drezner, Professor David Sadava, Professor Dorsey Armstrong

    36 Big Ideas

    • ORIGINAL (18 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By The Great Courses
    • Narrated By Professor Bart D. Ehrman, Professor Daniel W. Drezner, Professor David Sadava, and others
    Overall
    (11)
    Performance
    (9)
    Story
    (8)

    The Great Courses has produced thousands of lectures that have introduced millions of lifelong learners to some of the biggest and most fascinating ideas that humans have ever thought. Now, enjoy 36 lectures specially curated from some of our most popular courses and get an interesting learning experience across a wide range of disciplines.

    Amazon Customer says: "Way outdated"
  • The Elegant Universe: Superstrings, Hidden Dimensions, and the Quest for the Ultimate Theory (






UNABRIDGED) by Brian Greene Narrated by Erik Davies

    The Elegant Universe: Superstrings, Hidden Dimensions, and the Quest for the Ultimate Theory

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Brian Greene
    • Narrated By Erik Davies
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (531)
    Performance
    (247)
    Story
    (249)

    In a rare blend of scientific insight and writing as elegant as the theories it explains, one of the world's leading string theorists, peels away the layers of mystery surrounding string theory to reveal a universe that consists of 11 dimensions where the fabric of space tears and repairs itself, and all matter-from the smallest quarks to the most gargantuan supernovas-is generated by the vibrations of microscopically tiny loops of energy.

    Ginger says: "Very Very good"
  • Smashing Physics: Inside the Discovery of the Higgs Boson (






UNABRIDGED) by Jon Butterworth Narrated by Jonathan Keeble

    Smashing Physics: Inside the Discovery of the Higgs Boson

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 19 mins)
    • By Jon Butterworth
    • Narrated By Jonathan Keeble
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    The first insider account of the work at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the discovery of the Higgs particle - and what it all means for our understanding of the laws of nature. The discovery of the Higgs boson made headlines around the world. Two scientists, Peter Higgs and François Englert, whose theories predicted its existence, shared a Nobel Prize. The discovery was the culmination of the largest experiment ever run, the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

  • The Modern Scholar: Physics for Poets  by Richard T. Kouzes Narrated by Richard T. Kouzes

    The Modern Scholar: Physics for Poets

    • ORIGINAL (3 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Richard T. Kouzes
    • Narrated By Richard T. Kouzes
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Exploring many of the most significant concepts in physics, Professor Kouzes explains each in a very straightforward and approachable manner. He begins by examining the history of physics - the "knowledge of nature" - as a science which encompasses the study of matter and all of the phenomena that are observed in our universe. He also explores the origins of physics, tracing it back to the ancient world.

  • Magnetism: A Strange, Invisible, Strong Force That's Calling All the Shots (






UNABRIDGED) by Alan Hall, PhD Narrated by Kirk Hanley

    Magnetism: A Strange, Invisible, Strong Force That's Calling All the Shots

    • UNABRIDGED (55 mins)
    • By Alan Hall, PhD
    • Narrated By Kirk Hanley
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    We all know about magnetism right? But hold the phone! Where does this force come from in the first place? Did magnetism play a role in the creation of the universe? Why is this force important in everything from atomic structure to the way solar flares form?

  • 36 Big Ideas  by The Great Courses Narrated by Professor Bart D. Ehrman, Professor Daniel W. Drezner, Professor David Sadava, Professor Dorsey Armstrong

    36 Big Ideas

    • ORIGINAL (18 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By The Great Courses
    • Narrated By Professor Bart D. Ehrman, Professor Daniel W. Drezner, Professor David Sadava, and others
    Overall
    (11)
    Performance
    (9)
    Story
    (8)

    The Great Courses has produced thousands of lectures that have introduced millions of lifelong learners to some of the biggest and most fascinating ideas that humans have ever thought. Now, enjoy 36 lectures specially curated from some of our most popular courses and get an interesting learning experience across a wide range of disciplines.

    Amazon Customer says: "Way outdated"
  •  
  • Zoom: From Atoms and Galaxies to Blizzards and Bees: How Everything Moves (






UNABRIDGED) by Bob Berman Narrated by Dan Woren

    Zoom: From Atoms and Galaxies to Blizzards and Bees: How Everything Moves

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 47 mins)
    • By Bob Berman
    • Narrated By Dan Woren
    Overall
    (12)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (11)

    In Zoom, Bob Berman explores how motion shapes every aspect of the universe, literally from the ground up. With an informative and entertaining style and a knack for distilling the wondrous, Berman spans astronomy, geology, biology, meteorology, and the history of science, uncovering how clouds stay aloft, how the earth's rotation curves a home run's flight, and why a mosquito's familiar whine resembles a telephone's dial tone.

    rich says: "Fact Filled Fun Listen"
  • Physics for Rock Stars: Making the Laws of the Universe Work for You (






UNABRIDGED) by Christine McKinley Narrated by Tavia Gilbert

    Physics for Rock Stars: Making the Laws of the Universe Work for You

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Christine McKinley
    • Narrated By Tavia Gilbert
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    Physics for Rock Stars is not a weighty treatise on science, but a personal tour of physics from a quirky friend. Anyone who's ever wondered why nature abhors a vacuum, what causes magnetic attraction, or how to jump off a moving train or do a perfect stage dive will find answers and a few laughs, too. No equations, numbers, or tricky concepts - just an inspiring and comical romp through the basics of physics and the beauty of the organized universe.

  • The Cosmic Cocktail: Three Parts Dark Matter (






UNABRIDGED) by Katherine Freese Narrated by Tamara Marston

    The Cosmic Cocktail: Three Parts Dark Matter

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Katherine Freese
    • Narrated By Tamara Marston
    Overall
    (17)
    Performance
    (16)
    Story
    (17)

    The ordinary atoms that make up the known universe - from our bodies and the air we breathe to the planets and stars - constitute only 5 percent of all matter and energy in the cosmos. The rest is known as dark matter and dark energy, because their precise identities are unknown. The Cosmic Cocktail is the inside story of the epic quest to solve one of the most compelling enigmas of modern science - what is the universe made of? - told by one of today’s foremost pioneers in the study of dark matter.

  • The Science of Discworld: A Novel (






UNABRIDGED) by Terry Pratchett, Ian Stewart, Jack Cohen Narrated by Michael Fenton Stevens, Stephen Briggs

    The Science of Discworld: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Terry Pratchett, Ian Stewart, Jack Cohen
    • Narrated By Michael Fenton Stevens, Stephen Briggs
    Overall
    (31)
    Performance
    (29)
    Story
    (29)

    Not just another science audiobook and not just another Discworld novella, The Science of Discworld is a creative, mind-bending mash-up of fiction and fact, that offers a wizard’s-eye view of our world that will forever change how you look at the universe.

    Rachel says: "Not the best Pratchett, but gets there in the end"