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Kenneth

Kenneth LEESBURG, VA, United States Member Since 2005

Old & fat, but strong; American, Chinese, & Indian (sort of); Ph.D. in C.S.; strategy, economics & stability theory; trees & machining.

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  • "Disturbing Feature Article"

    Overall

    Scientific America Mind is always a good magazine.

    The feature article, argues that humans lie all the time, at all different levels, that we're wired to lie, and that it's advantageous to lie. The core argument would seem to be that lying bridges the gap between societies needs and individual needs, which are assumed to be fundamentally in conflict. There would seem to be some scientific support for this idea among other primates.

    The whole thing feels very Maoist.

    I suspect that there are environments and cultures where this is truer than in others. I suspect that the more oppressive an environment, be it a bad employer or a totalitarian government, the more lying is necessary, adaptive, and even a sign of political intelligence. But I also suspect that the less oppressive an environment the more being able to tell the truth is necessary, adaptive, and a sign of emotional intelligence. Current scientific thought, perhaps as a reflection of current American culture, seems to have swung in the direction of "Lying is good".

    More

    Lies: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 51 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (40)
    Performance
    (8)
    Story
    (8)

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six articles. The cover story, "Natural Born Liars", examines why we lie and why we're so good at it. Also in this issue: why innocent people confess to crimes they didn't commit; an in-depth examination of what dreams are and why we have them; the very real therapeutic uses for hypnosis; how to improve your powers of recall; and is mental stress increasing your chances of a heart attack?

    Kenneth says: "Disturbing Feature Article"
  • "Disturbing Feature Article"

    Overall

    Scientific America Mind is always a good magazine.

    The feature article, argues that humans lie all the time, at all different levels, that we're wired to lie, and that it's advantageous to lie. The core argument would seem to be that lying bridges the gap between societies needs and individual needs, which are assumed to be fundamentally in conflict. There would seem to be some scientific support for this idea among other primates.

    The whole thing feels very Maoist.

    I suspect that there are environments and cultures where this is truer than in others. I suspect that the more oppressive an environment, be it a bad employer or a totalitarian government, the more lying is necessary, adaptive, and even a sign of political intelligence. But I also suspect that the less oppressive an environment the more being able to tell the truth is necessary, adaptive, and a sign of emotional intelligence. Current scientific thought, perhaps as a reflection of current American culture, seems to have swung in the direction of "Lying is good".

    More

    Lies: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 51 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (40)
    Performance
    (8)
    Story
    (8)

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six articles. The cover story, "Natural Born Liars", examines why we lie and why we're so good at it. Also in this issue: why innocent people confess to crimes they didn't commit; an in-depth examination of what dreams are and why we have them; the very real therapeutic uses for hypnosis; how to improve your powers of recall; and is mental stress increasing your chances of a heart attack?

    Kenneth says: "Disturbing Feature Article"
  1. Lies: Scientific American...
  2. Lies: Scientific American...
  3. .

A Peek at Arthur's Bookshelf

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Laguna Niguel, CA, USA 0 REVIEWS / 0 ratings Member Since 2002 0 Followers / Following 0
 
Arthur's greatest hits:

Kluetzman

Kluetzman Albany, NY 07-22-03 Member Since 2002
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  • "scientific american"

    53 of 59 helpful votes

    Great concise excerpts of current technology in a broad range of fields. The mispronunciations can be distracting, however.

    More

    Scientific American, 1-Month Subscription

    • HIGHLIGHTS
    Overall
    (74)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Scientific American is the most well-known and most highly-respected science and technology monthly in the world. It plays a vital role in bringing scientific and technological achievement to the attention of the general public. Get the latest issue or subscribe!

    Fiona says: "Interesting marred by poor narration"

What's Trending in Magazine & Radio:

  • 4.3 (24 ratings)

    The Body Speaks: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 26 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (24)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (5)

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six articles. You will hear about exciting new advances in the early detection of autism, how people can be trained to recover their lost sense of smell, the special language skills that set humans apart from their fellow animals, and how the body speaks.

  • 4.3 (11 ratings)

    Scientific American, April 2006

    • NONE (1 hr and 18 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Scientific American
    Overall
    (11)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    This month, we'll hear about unusually smart animals, a new, even-greener brand of hybrid, a new compound that stops bacteria from mutating to resist antibiotics, and a look at the effect of globalization on the world's poor.

  • 4.1 (115 ratings)

    The Brain: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (115)
    Performance
    (12)
    Story
    (13)

    Studying how the mind and brain work sounds like it ought to be about as futile as trying to grab handfuls of air. Yet psychology, neuroscience and related fields have made amazing progress. This special issue of Scientific American reviews just a sliver of the discoveries that investigators from around the globe have made about the workings of our inner lives. The breadth of subjects tracks the vastness of thought.

    Douglas says: "It was pretty good..."
  • 3.8 (115 ratings)

    Science News, 1-Month Subscription

    • NONE (1 hr)
    • By Science Service
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (115)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Turn to Science News for the latest coverage of biology, astronomy, the physical sciences, behavioral sciences, math and computers, chemistry, and earth science. Since its debut in 1922, the publication has been known for its sharp writing and up-to-date coverage of the latest scientific research. Science News is committed to providing reports on scientific and technical developments that the layman will find interesting and easy to digest.

    Science News is available in audio exclusively at Audible.

    A User says: "Right level of detail"
  •  
  • 3.9 (106 ratings)

    Creativity: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 34 mins)
    • By Scientific American Mind
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (106)
    Performance
    (9)
    Story
    (9)

    The cover story in this issue explains how creativity and brilliance arises in all of us. Then, we'll take a look at the latest theories behind the experience commonly known as 'deja-vu'. Also, we'll learn about a mental breakdown that causes apathy so extreme it could become deadly, as well as Capgras syndrome, a perception disorder that causes people to think their loved ones have been replaced by extraterrestrial body doubles.

    Prospyros says: "Loved it"
  • 4.0 (82 ratings)

    Memory, Fear & Anger: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 51 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (82)
    Performance
    (12)
    Story
    (14)

    The cover story reveals how painful, long-term memories might actually be erased with the use of drugs at just the right moment. Then, an article that asks a provocative question - can we cure fear? Following that, it's an examination of anger -- should you control your emotions or let them rip? Next, it's a look at the persistence of myths -- and their connection to the brain's biological needs. Our fifth article seeks to explode one myth -- about the value of self-esteem.

  • 3.8 (77 ratings)

    Audible Technology Review, 1-Month Subscription

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 30 mins)
    • By Technology Review
    • Narrated By Todd Mundt
    Overall
    (77)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Technology Review, the award winning magazine from MIT, is the only publication you need to keep up with what's happening in every area of emerging technology. Audible Technology Review incorporates key feature stories from the magazine and is published ten times each year. Get the latest issue or subscribe!

    James says: "In-depth and well-rounded"
  • 4.0 (74 ratings)

    Scientific American, 1-Month Subscription

    • HIGHLIGHTS
    Overall
    (74)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Scientific American is the most well-known and most highly-respected science and technology monthly in the world. It plays a vital role in bringing scientific and technological achievement to the attention of the general public. Get the latest issue or subscribe!

    Fiona says: "Interesting marred by poor narration"
  •  
  • 3.9 (71 ratings)

    Human Evolution: Scientific American Special Edition

    • HIGHLIGHTS (3 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (71)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (11)

    Reading the cracked brown fragments of fossils and sequences of DNA, scientists have found clues that the story of human origins has more convolutions than previously thought. The account of our shared human heritage now includes more controversial plot twists and mysteries. Was the remarkable seven-million-year-old skull found in July 2002 in Chad really one of our first forebears, or a distant dead-end cousin with precociously evolved features?

    Mike says: "Excellent, informative, concise"
  • 4.1 (71 ratings)

    Consciousness: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (71)
    Performance
    (21)
    Story
    (21)

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven articles. The cover story deals with synesthesia, when senses blend together in the brain. Also in this issue: thrill seeking, intelligence drugs, power trips, first impressions, the winter blues and lastly better work through relaxation.

    Douglas says: "Good Issue..."
  • Scientific American, 1-Month Subscription

    • HIGHLIGHTS
    Overall
    (74)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Scientific American is the most well-known and most highly-respected science and technology monthly in the world. It plays a vital role in bringing scientific and technological achievement to the attention of the general public. Get the latest issue or subscribe!

    Fiona says: "Interesting marred by poor narration"
  • Science News, 1-Month Subscription

    • NONE (1 hr)
    • By Science Service
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (115)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Turn to Science News for the latest coverage of biology, astronomy, the physical sciences, behavioral sciences, math and computers, chemistry, and earth science. Since its debut in 1922, the publication has been known for its sharp writing and up-to-date coverage of the latest scientific research. Science News is committed to providing reports on scientific and technical developments that the layman will find interesting and easy to digest.

    Science News is available in audio exclusively at Audible.

    A User says: "Right level of detail"
  • Audible Technology Review, 1-Month Subscription

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 30 mins)
    • By Technology Review
    • Narrated By Todd Mundt
    Overall
    (77)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Technology Review, the award winning magazine from MIT, is the only publication you need to keep up with what's happening in every area of emerging technology. Audible Technology Review incorporates key feature stories from the magazine and is published ten times each year. Get the latest issue or subscribe!

    James says: "In-depth and well-rounded"
  • Scientific American: The Rise of Vertical Farms

    • UNABRIDGED (21 mins)
    • By Dickson Despommier
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (3)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (1)

    Large-scale agriculture in urban high-rises could revolutionize how we feed ourselves and future populations. This article was published in the November 2009 edition of Scientific American.

  •  
  • Science News, 12-Month Subscription

    • NONE (1 hr)
    • By Science Service
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Turn to Science News for the latest coverage of biology, astronomy, the physical sciences, behavioral sciences, math and computers, chemistry, and earth science. Since its debut in 1922, the publication has been known for its sharp writing and up-to-date coverage of the latest scientific research. Science News is committed to providing reports on scientific and technical developments that the layman will find interesting and easy to digest.

    Science News is available in audio exclusively at Audible.

    John says: "This fits my life -- and probably yours."
  • Could Food Shortages Bring Down Civilization?: Scientific American

    • UNABRIDGED (24 mins)
    • By Lester R. Brown
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (3)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    One of the biggest threats to global stability is the potential for food crises to cause government collapse in poor countries. This article was published in the May 2009 edition of Scientific American.

  • Scientific American, April 2014

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 29 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    "The First Starlight": The first stars ended the dark ages of the universe. "Rise of the Human Predator": Surprising new insights into how our ancestors became skilled hunters. "Journey to Bottom of the Sea": High-tech submersibles are poised to explore the ocean’s deepest trenches in an effort to tackle long-standing questions about exotic creatures, the source of tsunamis and the origins of life on earth. "The Genetic Geography of the Brain": The first detailed maps of what our genes are doing inside our brains challenge a long-held theory of how our gray matter works.

  • Consciousness: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (71)
    Performance
    (21)
    Story
    (21)

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven articles. The cover story deals with synesthesia, when senses blend together in the brain. Also in this issue: thrill seeking, intelligence drugs, power trips, first impressions, the winter blues and lastly better work through relaxation.

    Douglas says: "Good Issue..."
  •  
  • Scientific American: The Joyful Mind

    • UNABRIDGED (21 mins)
    • By Morten L. Kringelbach, Kent C. Berridge
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    A new understanding of how the brain generates pleasure could lead to better treatment of addiction and depression - and even to a new science of happiness.

  • Scientific American, March 2014

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 26 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    "The New Century of the Brain": New discoveries are lighting the way to an understanding of how the world’s most complex machine gives rise to our thoughts and emotions. "Dwarf Galaxies and the Dark Web": Small galaxies orbiting the Milky Way may have arrived via dark matter superhighways stretching across the universe. "Gene Therapy’s Second Act": After a decade and a half of tragic setbacks scientists now believe that gene therapy is ready to enter the clinic. "The Oldest Rocks on Earth": A battle of science is raging over an outcropping of glacier-cut rocks.

  • Scientific American, 12-Month Subscription

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (3)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Scientific American is the most well-known and most highly-respected science and technology monthly in the world. It plays a vital role in bringing scientific and technological achievement to the attention of the general public. Get the latest issue or subscribe!

  • Freud at 150: A Scientific American Mind Special Report

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 1 min)
    • By Mark Solms, J. Allan Hobson, Steve Ayan, and others
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (29)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (4)

    On the occasion of the 150th anniversary of Sigmund Freud's birth, Scientific American Mind examines the lasting, controversial legacy of the Father of Psychoanalysis.

    Douglas says: "Nothing earthshaking..."
  • Science News, April 19, 2014

    • HIGHLIGHTS (55 mins)
    • By Society for Science & the Public
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Turn to Science News for the latest coverage of biology, astronomy, the physical sciences, behavioral sciences, math and computers, chemistry, and earth science. This 75-year-old publication is known for its sharp writing and up-to-date coverage of the latest scientific research. Since its debut in 1922, Science News has been committed to providing reports on scientific and technical developments that the layman would find interesting and easy to digest.

  • Science News, April 12, 2014

    • HIGHLIGHTS (52 mins)
    • By Society for Science & the Public
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Turn to Science News for the latest coverage of biology, astronomy, the physical sciences, behavioral sciences, math and computers, chemistry, and earth science. This 75-year-old publication is known for its sharp writing and up-to-date coverage of the latest scientific research. Since its debut in 1922, Science News has been committed to providing reports on scientific and technical developments that the layman would find interesting and easy to digest.

  • Science News, April 05, 2014

    • HIGHLIGHTS (56 mins)
    • By Society for Science & the Public
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Turn to Science News for the latest coverage of biology, astronomy, the physical sciences, behavioral sciences, math and computers, chemistry, and earth science. This 75-year-old publication is known for its sharp writing and up-to-date coverage of the latest scientific research. Since its debut in 1922, Science News has been committed to providing reports on scientific and technical developments that the layman would find interesting and easy to digest.

  • Scientific American, April 2014

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 29 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    "The First Starlight": The first stars ended the dark ages of the universe. "Rise of the Human Predator": Surprising new insights into how our ancestors became skilled hunters. "Journey to Bottom of the Sea": High-tech submersibles are poised to explore the ocean’s deepest trenches in an effort to tackle long-standing questions about exotic creatures, the source of tsunamis and the origins of life on earth. "The Genetic Geography of the Brain": The first detailed maps of what our genes are doing inside our brains challenge a long-held theory of how our gray matter works.

  •  
  • Audible Technology Review, April 2014

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 8 mins)
    • By Technology Review
    • Narrated By Todd Mundt
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    You’ll learn what it’s like to use a device that can be controlled with your voice and a noise-cancelling headset. You’ll hear about the growing security problem Google is facing. You’ll learn how researchers have shown that the swipe-to-unlock action can be replaced. You’ll hear how WebTV’s creator is trying to make wireless technology that will give us faster, better mobile Internet access. You’ll learn how a few apps are starting to reveal what Google Glass could soon become. And you’ll hear news from the worlds of Biomedicine, Technology and Communications.

  • Scientific American: Journey to Bottom of the Sea

    • UNABRIDGED (24 mins)
    • By Kate Wong
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Hgh-tech submersibles are poised to explore the ocean’s deepest trenches in an effort to tackle long-standing questions about exotic creatures, the source of tsunamis and the origins of life on earth.

  • Science News, March 29, 2014

    • HIGHLIGHTS (53 mins)
    • By Society for Science & the Public
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Turn to Science News for the latest coverage of biology, astronomy, the physical sciences, behavioral sciences, math and computers, chemistry, and earth science. This 75-year-old publication is known for its sharp writing and up-to-date coverage of the latest scientific research. Since its debut in 1922, Science News has been committed to providing reports on scientific and technical developments that the layman would find interesting and easy to digest.