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Darwin8u

Darwin8u Mesa, AZ, United States Member Since 2011

A part-time buffoon and ersatz scholar specializing in BS, pedantry, schmaltz and cultural coprophagia.

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  • "Geologic Hell Breaks Loose Again"

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    I am nearly finished with the individual portions of' Annals of the Former World' ('Basin and Range' ☑, 'In Suspect Terrain' ☑, 'Assembling California' ☑). All I have left is to read the section 'Crossing the Craton' (a sixty page addition to his 40th parallel/I-80 project that filled in the blank in the map and allowed the publishers of 'Annals of the Former World' some additional McPhee text not found in the four main books/sections previously published to incentivize McPhee's fans to fork out the addtional $35 in 1998 to get the whole brilliant McPhee mess).

    I read/listened to these books a little out of order over a little over the last year. I started off well with 'Basin & Range', 'In Suspect Terrain', but then jumped to 'Assembling California' since a couple of weeks ago I was going to be driving through California and figured it would be nice to have some geology of the geography I was going to be driving through next to me.

    While I was a little disappointed with 'Assembling California', I loved 'Rising from the Plains'. I don't know if it was a return to my roots (Wyoming and Snake River and Mormon Country), or the fact that this book seemed just to excite McPhee more. You could tell he loved the Loves (David Love: Yale educated geologist, cowboy; John Love: David's father, mirthful Scot rancher/cowboy, nephew of John Muir; Ethel Waxham Love: David's mother, teacher, writer). He threads this family's golden personality and history with the geology and geography of Wyoming.

    These books are dangerous and should not be given to children. I am keeping them locked up with my William S. Burroughs, Henry Miller, etc. If my son or daughter (no field geology sexist me) were to discover these McPhee books too young (s)he might just grow up to be a passionate field geologist. Reading this as I near my 40s, McPhee almost makes me want to take up a hammer, hop on a horse and ride into the mountains.

    I give it four stars, simply because 'Coming into the Country' still exists for me as a slightly better book, but I think the combined energy of all of the 'Annals' is definitely amazing. I've grown to appreciate the narrative skills of Nelson Runger, although he went back and forth calling the Uinta Mountains at times the [WINtas) and at other times properly the (YOU-IN-tas). Anyway, a minor issue, but not overly distracting.

    More

    Rising From the Plains: Annals of the Former World, Book 3

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 32 mins)
    • By John McPhee
    • Narrated By Nelson Runger
    Overall
    (102)
    Performance
    (24)
    Story
    (24)

    Rising From the Plains takes McPhee to the high country of Utah along the Continental Divide. His guide is David Love, "the grand old man of Rocky Mountain geology". Helping McPhee see the physical changes that have shaped this region over millions of years, Love also traces his own family's history in this oil-rich, windswept land.

    Nancy says: "Terrific Read"
  1. Rising From the Plains: A...
  2. .

A Peek at Neuron's Bookshelf

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Sweden 17 REVIEWS / 20 ratings Member Since 2012 3 Followers / Following 5
 
Neuron's greatest hits:
  • Energy for Future Presidents: The Science Behind the Headlines

    "Excellent overview over current and future energy"

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I will start by admitting that I am a fan of Richard Muller. Before I even went to university I watched every lecture in his "Physics for future presidents" course at UC Berkeley, which was one of the first courses to become available online as a free webcast. I would describe Muller as an honest and rigorous scientist who is not afraid to speak his mind even when his views are controversial. He is also very critical of the way that different energy issues are portrayed in the media, something which you will realize if you read this book.

    One good example of what can only be called overblown media reporting is what followed the BP oil spill in the Mexican gulf. When it happened the media was reporting on little else and many high standing politicians described it as one of the worst (sometimes the worst) environmental disasters in the history of mankind. What happened next? Suddenly the media moved on and I was surprised to learn (from this book) that though the initial explosion killed 11 workers, the subsequent oil spill only caused 6000-30.000 bird deaths. "Only" is indeed the appropriate term here, considering that glass windows kill 100.000.000 birds annually and power lines kill many million more. The BP oil spill was unfortunate, and it cost human lives, some birds and a lot of money to fix it, but it is clear that the media and the politicians got a bit carried away with this one.

    Another so called " disaster" which got an unfair treatment in the media was the Fukushima power plant accident. To date not a single person have died from the radiation released and the prognosis is that a few hundred extra cancers, some of which could have a fatal outcome, will be the result of this “disaster”. My Fukushima headline would have read: “No deaths from breakdown of old nuclear power plant even though it was hit with an 8.0 earthquake and a tsunami”... (also see my pre-fukushima post on the irrational fear of nuclear power as well as my Review of the book “Radiation”).

    Richard Muller spends a good deal of this book discussing the ever controversial topic of Global Warming. He was at a point very critical of the methodology used by climate researchers when they calculated the rate of global warming. For example it is not appropriate to use weather stations in populated areas because as population grows so does temperature. He also found some of the mathematics used... funky...

    For this reason he did his own study, and unlike IPCC researchers this study was/is completely transparent with all data freely available for anyone who desires to make their own calculations. What did Muller find? Basically he says that the IPCC, despite their sometimes flawed methods, are correct. In other words, according to Muller the globe has warmed, and this warming has been due to human caused increases in atmospheric CO2 levels. While backing their overall conclusions about the temperature increase on earth Muller does not seem to share many peoples sense of pending disaster due to this warming. Models that predict the future climate of earth tends to have a lot of uncertainty associated with them, and it is almost impossible to know if we are able to come up with technologies that will significantly alter the future climate.

    He also says that if we really want to prevent increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere we should turn our efforts to China. For quite a long time they have been building one coal plant per week spewing out not only CO2, but also huge amounts of other pollutants such as lead and arsenic. Convincing them to use clean energy sources such as solar or nuclear power (by paying them if necessary), makes a lot more sense than going for expensive alternatives in the west. That is, if you aim to achieve the maximal reduction of CO2 release per dollar, that dollar should be invested in China. Muller also reiterates several times throughout the book that energy conservation will be a huge part of the future. Proper isolation of houses, driving efficient cars etc can drastically reduce energy expenditure.

    I have really only touched upon some of the issues that are discussed in this book. Muller offers a perspective on many other energy related issues such as Shale gas/oil, electric cars, fusion, wind/solar/water energy, etc etc. All in all this book is both very educational and at the same time a page turner (keep in mind though that I am kind of a nerd). If you are even just a little interested in the technologies and politics related to energy issues this book is a terrific buy!

Roy

Roy Beaumont, TX, United States 08-03-09 Member Since 2005
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  • "Informative"

    9 of 9 helpful votes

    I decided to approach Steven Weinberg's "Dreams of a Final Theory" because it is an area about which I know little. The Audible offering of the book is very good. I seek out books that are well read, well written and informative. This audio volume wins on all three counts.

    I came to the book as less than a novice. I caught onto the authors points without a deep understanding of math, E=MC2 or anything of the kind. His chapter, "On a Piece of Chalk," introduced basic principles of Atomic Theory in a clear way. His placement of physics into historical context was particularly helpful.

    If you are a novice and would like to learn something new - this may well be worth your time. It was worth the time so far as I was concerned.

    More

    Dreams of a Final Theory: The Scientist's Search for the Ultimate Laws of Nature

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By Steven Weinberg
    • Narrated By Stuart Langton
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (37)
    Performance
    (14)
    Story
    (14)

    This is the story of a grand scientific quest: the quest for a unifying theory of nature. Writing with dazzling elegance and clarity, Nobel Prize - winning physicist Steven Weinberg retraces the steps that have led modern scientists from relativity theory and quantum mechanics to the notion of superstrings and the idea that our universe may coexist with others. Along the way, he voices the questions that are always present: Why does each explanation of the way nature works point to other, deeper explanations?

    Roy says: "Informative"

What's Trending in Environment:

  • 4.4 (3225 ratings)

    The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Michael Pollan
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3225)
    Performance
    (1001)
    Story
    (999)

    "What should we have for dinner?" To one degree or another, this simple question assails any creature faced with a wide choice of things to eat. Anthropologists call it the omnivore's dilemma. Choosing from among the countless potential foods nature offers, humans have had to learn what is safe, and what isn't. Today, as America confronts what can only be described as a national eating disorder, the omnivore's dilemma has returned with an atavistic vengeance.

    Stephen Redding says: "Great presentation of a moral dilemma"
  • 4.7 (429 ratings)

    The Elephant Whisperer: My Life with the Herd in the African Wild

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 54 mins)
    • By Lawrence Anthony, Graham Spence
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (429)
    Performance
    (391)
    Story
    (400)

    >When South African conservationist Lawrence Anthony was asked to accept a herd of "rogue" wild elephants on his Thula Thula game reserve in Zululand, his common sense told him to refuse. But he was the herd's last chance of survival: they would be killed if he wouldn't take them. In order to save their lives, Anthony took them in. In the years that followed he became a part of their family. And as he battled to create a bond with the elephants, he came to realize that they had a great deal to teach him about life, loyalty, and freedom.

    Tango says: "Beautiful story, beautifully written"
  • 4.4 (102 ratings)

    Rising From the Plains: Annals of the Former World, Book 3

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 32 mins)
    • By John McPhee
    • Narrated By Nelson Runger
    Overall
    (102)
    Performance
    (24)
    Story
    (24)

    Rising From the Plains takes McPhee to the high country of Utah along the Continental Divide. His guide is David Love, "the grand old man of Rocky Mountain geology". Helping McPhee see the physical changes that have shaped this region over millions of years, Love also traces his own family's history in this oil-rich, windswept land.

    Nancy says: "Terrific Read"
  • 4.4 (85 ratings)

    Food of the Gods: The Search for the Original Tree of Knowledge : A Radical History of Plants, Drugs, and Human Evolution

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Terence McKenna
    • Narrated By Jeffrey Kafer
    Overall
    (85)
    Performance
    (74)
    Story
    (74)

    Terence McKenna hypothesizes that as the North African jungles receded, giving way to savannas and grasslands near the end of the most recent ice age, a branch of our arboreal primate ancestors left the forest canopy and began living in the open areas beyond. There they experimented with new varieties of foods as they adapted, physically and mentally, to the environment. Among the new foods found in this environment were psilocybin-containing mushrooms.

    Denise (Jade) Greene says: "A paradigm shifting experience"
  •  
  • 4.4 (71 ratings)

    Animal Wise: The Thoughts and Emotions of Our Fellow Creatures

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Virginia Morell
    • Narrated By Kirsten Potter
    Overall
    (71)
    Performance
    (57)
    Story
    (57)

    Noted science writer Virginia Morell explores the frontiers of research on animal cognition and emotion, offering a surprising and moving exploration into the hearts and minds of wild and domesticated animals. Did you know that ants teach, earthworms make decisions, rats love to be tickled, and chimps grieve? Did you know that some dogs have thousand-word vocabularies and that birds practice songs in their sleep? That crows improvise tools, blue jays plan ahead, and moths remember living as caterpillars?

    Kathi says: "Beautiful insights into the minds of animals"
  • 4.5 (45 ratings)

    The Food Revolution: How Your Diet Can Help Save Your Life and Our World

    • ABRIDGED (6 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By John Robbins
    • Narrated By John Robbins
    Overall
    (45)
    Performance
    (41)
    Story
    (41)

    Here, the man who started the "food revolution" with the million-plus-selling Diet for a New America, boldly posits that, collectively, our personal diet can save ourselves and the world. If, according to chaos theory, the beating of a butterfly's wing can cause a hurricane in another part of the world, try this out for chaotic cause and effect: monarch butterflies are dying in droves due to genetically-engineered corn growing in the Midwest. There is also a direct correlation between the Big Mac in your hand and the mile-wide river now running across the North Pole.

    Mike says: "The Revolution That Is A Wake Up Call"
  • 4.3 (41 ratings)

    Healthy Eating, Healthy World: Unleashing the Power of PlantBased Nutrition

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By J. Morris Hicks, J Stanfield Hicks
    • Narrated By Mike Chamberlain
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (41)
    Performance
    (35)
    Story
    (36)

    This book is all about the single most powerful move that humans can make to promote health, reduce obesity, lower the cost of health care, nurture our fragile environment, conserve our energy resources, feed the world’s steadily growing population, and greatly reduce the suffering of animals in factory farms all over the world. As Dr. T. Colin Campbell says, “It turns out that if we eat the way that promotes the best health for ourselves, we also promote the best health for the planet."

    J. Lazarow says: "Loaded with Information"
  • 4.7 (39 ratings)

    Gaining Ground: A Story of Farmers' Markets, Local Food, and Saving the Family Farm

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 16 mins)
    • By Forrest Pritchard
    • Narrated By Roger Wayne
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (39)
    Performance
    (38)
    Story
    (38)

    One fateful day in 1996, after discovering that five freight cars' worth of glittering corn have reaped a tiny profit of $18.16, young Forrest Pritchard vows to save his family's farm. What ensues-through hilarious encounters with all manner of livestock and colorful local characters-is a crash course in sustainable agriculture. Pritchard's biggest ally is his renegade father, who initially questions his son's career choice and rejects organic foods for sugary mainstream fare.

    Sweetbay says: "Loved it! I wanted it to go on further"
  • Farmageddon: The True Cost of Cheap Meat

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Philip Lymbery, Isabel Oakeshott
    • Narrated By Julian Elfer
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    Farm animals have been disappearing from our fields as the production of food has become a global industry. We no longer know for certain what is entering the food chain and what we are eating - as the UK horsemeat scandal demonstrated. We are reaching a tipping point as the farming revolution threatens our countryside, health, and the quality of our food wherever we live in the world.

  • The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Michael Pollan
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3225)
    Performance
    (1001)
    Story
    (999)

    "What should we have for dinner?" To one degree or another, this simple question assails any creature faced with a wide choice of things to eat. Anthropologists call it the omnivore's dilemma. Choosing from among the countless potential foods nature offers, humans have had to learn what is safe, and what isn't. Today, as America confronts what can only be described as a national eating disorder, the omnivore's dilemma has returned with an atavistic vengeance.

    Stephen Redding says: "Great presentation of a moral dilemma"
  • The Boom: How Fracking Ignited the American Energy Revolution and Changed the World

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By Russell Gold
    • Narrated By Patrick Lawlor
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    Russell Gold, a brilliant and dogged investigative reporter at The Wall Street Journal, has spent more than a decade reporting on one of the biggest stories of our time: the spectacular, world-changing rise of "fracking". Recognized as a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and a recipient of the Gerald Loeb Award for his work, Gold has traveled along the pipelines and into the hubs of this country’s energy infrastructure; he has visited frack sites from Texas to North Dakota; and he has conducted thousands of interviews with engineers and wildcatters, CEOs and roughnecks, environmentalists and politicians.

  • The Frackers: The Outrageous Inside Story of the New Billionaire Wildcatters

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Gregory Zuckerman
    • Narrated By Sean Pratt
    Overall
    (56)
    Performance
    (54)
    Story
    (55)

    Everyone knew it was crazy to try to extract oil and natural gas buried in shale rock deep below the ground. Everyone, that is, except a few reckless wildcatters - who risked their careers to prove the world wrong. Things looked grim for American energy in 2006. Oil production was in steep decline and natural gas was hard to find. The Iraq War threatened the nation’s already tenuous relations with the Middle East. China was rapidly industrializing and competing for resources.

    T. Chambless says: "Excellent Book but Mispronunciations Abound!"
  •  
  • Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 31 mins)
    • By Dan Fagin
    • Narrated By Dan Woren
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (20)
    Performance
    (18)
    Story
    (19)

    One of New Jersey’s seemingly innumerable quiet seaside towns, Toms River became the unlikely setting for a decades-long drama that culminated in 2001 with one of the largest legal settlements in the annals of toxic dumping. A town that would rather have been known for its Little League World Series champions ended up making history for an entirely different reason: a notorious cluster of childhood cancers scientifically linked to local air and water pollution.

    Beezie Reader says: "Toms River Resident"
  • Silent Spring

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Rachel Carson
    • Narrated By Kaiulani Lee
    Overall
    (205)
    Performance
    (102)
    Story
    (102)

    First published in 1962, Silent Spring can single-handedly be credited with sounding the alarm and raising awareness of humankind's collective impact on its own future through chemical pollution. No other book has so strongly influenced the environmental conscience of Americans and the world at large.

    Kenneth says: "Ahead of her times..."
  • Gaining Ground: A Story of Farmers' Markets, Local Food, and Saving the Family Farm

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 16 mins)
    • By Forrest Pritchard
    • Narrated By Roger Wayne
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (39)
    Performance
    (38)
    Story
    (38)

    One fateful day in 1996, after discovering that five freight cars' worth of glittering corn have reaped a tiny profit of $18.16, young Forrest Pritchard vows to save his family's farm. What ensues-through hilarious encounters with all manner of livestock and colorful local characters-is a crash course in sustainable agriculture. Pritchard's biggest ally is his renegade father, who initially questions his son's career choice and rejects organic foods for sugary mainstream fare.

    Sweetbay says: "Loved it! I wanted it to go on further"
  • Food of the Gods: The Search for the Original Tree of Knowledge : A Radical History of Plants, Drugs, and Human Evolution

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Terence McKenna
    • Narrated By Jeffrey Kafer
    Overall
    (85)
    Performance
    (74)
    Story
    (74)

    Terence McKenna hypothesizes that as the North African jungles receded, giving way to savannas and grasslands near the end of the most recent ice age, a branch of our arboreal primate ancestors left the forest canopy and began living in the open areas beyond. There they experimented with new varieties of foods as they adapted, physically and mentally, to the environment. Among the new foods found in this environment were psilocybin-containing mushrooms.

    Denise (Jade) Greene says: "A paradigm shifting experience"
  •  
  • Seeds of Hope: Wisdom and Wonder from the World of Plants

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 5 mins)
    • By Jane Goodall, Gail Hudson (contributor)
    • Narrated By Edita Brychta, Rick Zieff, Jane Goodall
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    In her wise and elegant new audiobook, Jane Goodall blends her experience in nature with her enthusiasm for botany to give listeners a deeper understanding of the world around us. Long before her work with chimpanzees, Goodall's passion for the natural world sprouted in the backyard of her childhood home in England, where she climbed her beech tree and made elderberry wine with her grandmother. The garden her family began then, she continues to enjoy today. Seeds of Hope takes us from England to Goodall's home-away-from-home in Africa.

    David Chandler says: "Goodall makes a complex subject relatable."
  • The Elephant Whisperer: My Life with the Herd in the African Wild

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 54 mins)
    • By Lawrence Anthony, Graham Spence
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (429)
    Performance
    (391)
    Story
    (400)

    >When South African conservationist Lawrence Anthony was asked to accept a herd of "rogue" wild elephants on his Thula Thula game reserve in Zululand, his common sense told him to refuse. But he was the herd's last chance of survival: they would be killed if he wouldn't take them. In order to save their lives, Anthony took them in. In the years that followed he became a part of their family. And as he battled to create a bond with the elephants, he came to realize that they had a great deal to teach him about life, loyalty, and freedom.

    Tango says: "Beautiful story, beautifully written"
  • The Soil Will Save Us: How Scientists, Farmers, and Ranchers Are Tending the Soil to Reverse Global Warming

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Kristin Ohlson
    • Narrated By Dina Pearlman
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    In The Soil Will Save Us, journalist and bestselling author Kristin Ohlson makes an elegantly argued, passionate case for "our great green hope"—a way in which we can not only heal the land but also turn atmospheric carbon into beneficial soil carbon—and potentially reverse global warming. Her discoveries and vivid storytelling will revolutionize the way we think about our food, our landscapes, our plants, and our relationship to Earth.

  • Energy for Future Presidents: The Science Behind the Headlines

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Richard A. Muller
    • Narrated By Pete Larkin
    Overall
    (62)
    Performance
    (55)
    Story
    (55)

    The near-meltdown of Fukushima, the upheavals in the Middle East, the BP oil rig explosion, and the looming reality of global warming have reminded the president and all U.S. citizens that nothing has more impact on our lives than the supply of and demand for energy. Its procurement dominates our economy and foreign policy more than any other factor. But the "energy question" is more confusing, contentious, and complicated than ever before.

    Neuron says: "Excellent overview over current and future energy"
  • Farmageddon: The True Cost of Cheap Meat

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Philip Lymbery, Isabel Oakeshott
    • Narrated By Julian Elfer
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    Farm animals have been disappearing from our fields as the production of food has become a global industry. We no longer know for certain what is entering the food chain and what we are eating - as the UK horsemeat scandal demonstrated. We are reaching a tipping point as the farming revolution threatens our countryside, health, and the quality of our food wherever we live in the world.

  • A Trust Betrayed: The Untold Story of Camp Lejeune and the Poisoning of Generations of Marines and Their Families

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Mike Magner
    • Narrated By Steve Carlson
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    While the big bad corporation has often been the offender in many of the world’s greatest environmental disasters, in the case of the mass poisoning at Camp Lejeune the culprit is a revered institution: the US Marine Corps. For two decades now, revelations have steadily emerged about pervasive contamination, associated clusters of illness and death among the Marine families stationed there, and military stonewalling and failure to act.

  • The Galápagos: A Natural History

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Henry Nicholls
    • Narrated By James Adams
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
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    The Galapagos were once known to the sailors and pirates who encountered them as Las Encantadas: the enchanted islands, home to exotic creatures and dramatic volcanic scenery. In The Galapagos, science writer Henry Nicholls offers a lively natural and human history of the archipelago, charting its evolution from deserted wilderness to scientific resource (made famous by Charles Darwin) and global ecotourism hot spot.

  • The Boom: How Fracking Ignited the American Energy Revolution and Changed the World

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By Russell Gold
    • Narrated By Patrick Lawlor
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    Russell Gold, a brilliant and dogged investigative reporter at The Wall Street Journal, has spent more than a decade reporting on one of the biggest stories of our time: the spectacular, world-changing rise of "fracking". Recognized as a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and a recipient of the Gerald Loeb Award for his work, Gold has traveled along the pipelines and into the hubs of this country’s energy infrastructure; he has visited frack sites from Texas to North Dakota; and he has conducted thousands of interviews with engineers and wildcatters, CEOs and roughnecks, environmentalists and politicians.

  •  
  • Poison Spring: The Secret History of Pollution and the EPA

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 47 mins)
    • By E. G. Vallianatos, McKay Jenkins
    • Narrated By Michael McConnahie
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Imagine walking into a restaurant and finding chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides, or neonicotinoid insecticides listed in the description of your entree. They may not be printed in the menu, but many are in your food.These are a few of the literally millions of pounds of approved synthetic substances dumped into the environment every day, not just in the US but around the world.

  • Baptized in PCBs: Race, Pollution, and Justice in an All-American Town

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Ellen Griffith Spears
    • Narrated By Bernadette Dunne
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
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    In the mid-1990s, residents of Anniston, Alabama, began a legal fight against the agrochemical company Monsanto over the dumping of PCBs in the city's historically African American and white working-class west side. Simultaneously, Anniston environmentalists sought to safely eliminate chemical weaponry that had been secretly stockpiled near the city during the Cold War. In this probing work, Ellen Griffith Spears offers a compelling narrative of Anniston's battles for environmental justice.

  • Touching the Wild: Living with the Mule Deer of Deadman Gulch

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Joe Hutto
    • Narrated By Daniel May
    Overall
    (0)
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    (0)
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    Emmy Award - winning filmmaker, writer, and naturalist Joe Hutto has done it again. Touching the Wild is the enchanting story about one man who has lived with a herd of mule deer in the Wind River mountains of Wyoming for almost seven years. Why, you may ask, would a person choose to do such a thing? His response: how could you not? For Joe Hutto, close proximity to wild things is irresistible. In Illumination in the Flatwoods he unveiled the secret lives of the wild turkey to great critical acclaim.